8 More Weird Laws In Switzerland

You can’t recycle on Sundays

The Swiss love a good bit of recycling and they claim to be the best in the world at it – just not on Sundays. Just ask convicted felon Judith Schulte, a 35-year old German woman who committed the unforgivable crime of dropping off her recycling on the legally enforced day of rest. She was duly reported by one of her neighbours and offered a 250-franc fine or two-nights in jail.

You can’t cut your grass on Sundays

Look, you’re just going to make loads of noise and ruffle up some feathers, best just leave it until Monday. This is part of a much wider campaign against making “excessive noise”. The rules on this are pretty vague and vary canton by canton. The state of Geneva has a handy guide that illuminates some of the other things that are considered too noisy like taking a bath at night, or doing any kind of DIY. Just go to IKEA, okay?

Hanging out your laundry on Sunday

Just stay home, lock your doors (quietly), read a book and forget about leaving the house on Sunday. Closing your door could get you denounced, capiche?

You can’t hike naked

There’s nothing like the cool, refreshing feel of the fresh Alpine air on your nether regions. But you’ll have to pack it in when you’re in the tiny canton of Appenzell, a conservative stronghold in eastern Switzerland. After an influx of naked, supposedly German, hikers invaded their mountains, the local authorities fought back and fined one unlucky man in the buff, arguing it breached “decency customs”, setting a precedent to punish future naked ramblers. Fair enough.

You can’t ski while reciting poetry

Apparently this is forbidden, but exactly who is monitoring such an activity isn’t certain. Why would you want to do it anyway? We can only imagine how such a law came to pass.

You can’t use a high-pressure power hose on your car

Using a power hose to clean your car is “basically forbidden” in Switzerland, due to fears of polluting local water supplies and the wider environment, Reto Baumann, an environmental specialist, said in 2013. So you’ll have to make do with one of those incredibly eco-friendly drive-in washers.

Your weed can’t be too strong

Switzerland loves weed. Its government, not so much. But it does have some pretty liberal laws and decriminalised possession in 2012, replacing it with a fine system that is a little hazy. For instance, unlike most countries in Europe, permissible levels of THC (the part of weed that gets you high) are allowed up to 1 per cent (most of Europe generally cuts this off at below 0.2 per cent). If you are caught with weed the police can take it to be tested for its THC levels, if it comes back above 1 per cent you pay a fine and the cost of the drug test.

You must fear nuclear doom

Every house in Switzerland has to have, or have access to, a nuclear shelter. So if you want to build yourself a nice Swiss house, but don’t fear immediate annihilation at the hands of a nuclear strike, you might want to think twice about moving to Switzerland.

RIP Jack Charlton

John “Jack” Charlton OBE DL (8 May 1935 – 10 July 2020) died yesterday at the age of 85. He was an English footballer and manager who played as a defender. He was part of the England team that won the 1966 World Cup. He spent his entire club career with Leeds United from 1950 to 1973, helping the club to the Second Division title (1963–64), First Division title (1968–69), FA Cup (1972), League Cup (1968 ), Charity Shield (1969), Inter-Cities Fairs Cup (1968 and 1971), as well as one other promotion from the Second Division (1955–56) and five second-place finishes in the First Division, two FA Cup final defeats and one Inter-Cities Fairs Cup final defeat. His 629 league and 762 total competitive appearances are club records. He was the elder brother of former Manchester United forward Bobby Charlton, who was also a teammate in England’s World Cup final victory. In 2006, Leeds United supporters voted Charlton into the club’s greatest ever XI.

Called up to the England team days before his 30th birthday, Charlton went on to score six goals in 35 international games and to appear in two World Cups and one European Championship. He played in the World Cup final victory over West Germany in 1966, and also helped England to finish third in Euro 1968 and to win four British Home Championship tournaments. He was named FWA Footballer of the Year in 1967. After retiring as a player he worked as a manager, and led Middlesbrough to the Second Division title in 1973–74, winning the Manager of the Year award in his first season as a manager. He kept Boro as a stable top-flight club before he resigned in April 1977.

He took charge of Sheffield Wednesday in October 1977, and led the club to promotion out of the Third Division in 1979–80. He left the Owls in May 1983, and went on to serve Middlesbrough as caretaker-manager at the end of the 1983–84 season. He worked as Newcastle United manager for the 1984–85 season. He took charge of the Republic of Ireland national team in February 1986, and led them to their first ever World Cup in 1990, where they reached the quarter-finals. He also led the nation to successful qualification to Euro 1988 and the 1994 World Cup. He resigned in January 1996 and went into retirement. He was married to Pat Kemp and they had three children.