Childhood Reading Pleasures

What was your favorite book as a child? If you have kids, do your children love it as much as you did?

I don’t think I had one favourite book as a kid. I read a lot and I read a lot of books. I read Amar Chitra Katha, Tinkle, Archies, Super hero – DC & Marvel and a lot of Indrajal comics (Phantom, Mandrake, Dick Kirby etc) and a bunch of others. Among my favourites were Nancy Drew, The Famous Five and the Hardy Boys books. Those were cool for that age man. I wouldn’t want to read them now as I would find them boring now; but as a kid those stories was awesome.

There is one more such teenage detective story series but the name escapes me. I remember reading a few of their books as well and enjoyed them as well. Actually, now that I recall there was one book which I read over and over again. That would be Robinson Crusoe! I remember devouring that book – with images and dialogue bubbles as well – and atleast 20 or more times. I dunno why but that story spoke to me.

From the same publishers I also got The Prisoner of Zenda and that too was a book I read a lot from the age of 8 to 12. Enjoyable as heck!

Prompt from 30 DAYS OF NOVEMBER WRITING PROMPTS at the SitsGirls

The Novel That Never Was

Do You Want to Write a Book?

Yes. Once upon a time, I always envisioned that I would end up writing atleast one book which will get published, maybe more. So far no go.

But there was a time when I did write 13 chapters of this idea for a novel I had. It was a scifi concept of a guy who befriends a scientist/inventor who disappears and our protagonist investigates. When he finds the scientist’s secret lab hidden under the latter’s garage he stumbles onto a large device that transports him into an alternate universe – one in which after two more world wars, men are rare and women dominate the planet.

The women keep men as slaves, for labour and for sex, and there are tussles between women in power to keep their quota of slaves. One man is shared by several women, who have assumed a post-apocalyptic military lifestyle. Our protagonist is found and enslaved but uses his wits to keep himself at the top of the slave chain and he doesn’t have to do much physical labour due to his smarts being used to help the women in command.

At one point – had I finished the novel – he would have escaped with a few women who are more gentle and kind and take a boat off to an island where they can live in peace with other like-minded men and women. But I never got that far.

Prompt from The Learning Network at The New York Times

RIP Hugh Hefner

Hugh Hefner, who created Playboy magazine and spun it into a media and entertainment-industry giant — all the while, as its very public avatar, squiring attractive young women (and sometimes marrying them) well into his 80s — died on Wednesday at his home, the Playboy Mansion near Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 91. His death was announced by Playboy Enterprises. Hefner was a stunning success from his emergence in the early 1950s. His timing was perfect.

The first issue of Playboy was published in 1953, when Mr. Hefner was 27 years old, a new father married to, by his account, the first woman he had slept with. The first issue of Playboy was financed with $600 of his own money and several thousand more in borrowed funds, including $1,000 from his mother. But his biggest asset was a nude calendar photograph of Marilyn Monroe. He had bought the rights for $500. He had only recently moved out of his parents’ house and left his job at Children’s Activities magazine. Mr. Hefner was reviled, first by guardians of the 1950s social order — J. Edgar Hoover among them — and later by feminists. But Playboy’s circulation reached one million by 1960 and peaked at about seven million in the 1970s.

Long after other publishers made the nude “Playmate” centerfold look more sugary than daring, Playboy remained the most successful men’s magazine in the world. Hefner’s company branched into movie, cable and digital production, sold its own line of clothing and jewelry, and opened clubs, resorts and casinos. The brand faded over the years, and by 2015 the magazine’s circulation had dropped to about 800,000 — although among men’s magazines it was outsold by only one, Maxim, which was founded in 1995. Hefner remained editor in chief even after agreeing to the magazine’s startling decision in 2015 to stop publishing nude photographs. Mr. Hefner handed over creative control of Playboy last year to his son Cooper Hefner. He admitted to being “‘involved’ with maybe eleven out of twelve months’ worth of Playmates” during some of these years.

Hefner had a minor stroke in 1985 at the age of 59. After re-evaluating his lifestyle, he made several changes. The wild, all-night parties were toned down significantly and in 1988, daughter Christie began to run the Playboy empire. The following year, he married Playmate of the Year Kimberley Conrad; they were 36 years apart in age. The couple had two sons: Marston Glenn (born 1990) and Cooper Bradford (born 1991). In January 2009, Hefner started dating Crystal Harris, joining the Shannon Twins after his previous “number one girlfriend”, Holly Madison, had ended their seven-year relationship. On December 24, 2010, he became engaged to Harris, to become his third wife. Harris broke off their engagement on June 14, 2011, five days before their planned wedding. The two later reconciled, and on December 31, 2012, Harris and Hefner married at the Playboy Mansion in a small private ceremony; he was 86 and she was 26.

Off The Shelf

Take a look at your bookcase. If you had enough free time, which book would be the first one you’d like to reread? Why?

Definitely Stephen King’s IT. This has been stated before in this blog – IT is my favourite novel of all time. It is enormous and it is thrilling and it is touching. And it has everything in it – horror, humour, love, sex, friendships, loyalty, family, sadness, loneliness and standing up against bullying, whether it is by a human being or by something that is supernatural.

I have read the book several times but not in the last 5 years or more. I first watch the mini-series as a 15 year old kid and then got the book at the library to read a year or so later and read it in 2 days without doing much else other than eating, drinking and sleeping in between. The book was compelling and I could barely put it down for doing other stuff. I rarely find the time to read anymore as well, during my spare time, I am always online or watching a tv series or a movie. Who has the time for books?

But this book which I keep above all else – I have a copy and it is dog eared – is my favourite still. I will always treasure it.

Prompt from The Daily Post at WordPress.com

Read Out

Take a look at your bookcase. If you had enough free time, which book would be the first one you’d like to reread? Why?

Well, I’m gonna change this up a bit. It’s not a book I haven finished reading yet but it’s a book that I started to read and reached about a quarter of the way through. I’m talking about the first book in the A Song Of Ice & Fire series : Game of Thrones. I picked up the novel last year but I have only managed to reach about a quarter of it. Mind you, I have seen the first 6 seasons of the tv show and am a big fan of them. The books however, I haven’t even managed to put a dent in them.

The whole problem is because the series is so awesome and gives you such a wonderful viewing experience, which is something I love, getting into the books or atleast the first book, has been tough. Also I don’t spend as much as I used to on reading books. I devoured books for many years, reading and rereading them a lot. But Youtube has pretty much rendered me dead to most other stuff. Except ofcourse real tv shows and movies. Thus I have barely read any books in the last….3 years or so!

I know it’s a shame but I just can’t bring myself to dedicate sometime for some book reading anymore. I guess I will eventually get back to it someday. Just not in the near future.

Prompt from The Daily Post at WordPress.com

RIP Gene Wilder

Gene Wilder, who regularly stole the show in such comedic gems as “The Producers,” “Blazing Saddles,” “Young Frankenstein,” “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” and “Stir Crazy,” died Monday at his home in Stamford, Conn. His nephew Jordan Walker-Pearlman said he died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease. He was 83. He had been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 1989.

The comic actor, who was twice Oscar nominated, for his role in “The Producers” and for co-penning “Young Frankenstein” with Mel Brooks, usually portrayed a neurotic who veered between total hysteria and dewy-eyed tenderness. “My quiet exterior used to be a mask for hysteria,” he told Time magazine in 1970. “After seven years of analysis, it just became a habit.” Habit or not, he got a great deal of mileage out of his persona in the 1970s for directors like Mel Brooks and Woody Allen, leading to a few less successful stints behind the camera, the best of which was “The Woman in Red,” co-starring then-wife Gilda Radner. Wilder was devastated by Radner’s death from ovarian cancer in 1989 and worked only intermittently after that. He tried his hand briefly at a sitcom in 1994, “Something Wilder,” and won an Emmy in 2003 for a guest role on “Will & Grace.”

In 1971 he stepped into the shoes of Willy Wonka, one of his most beloved and gentle characters. Based on the children’s book by Roald Dahl, “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” was not an immediate hit but became a children’s favorite over the years. The same cannot be said for the 1974 Stanley Donen-directed musical version of “The Little Prince,” in which Wilder appeared as the fox. He had somewhat better luck in Woody Allen’s spoof “Everything You Wanted to Know About Sex,” appearing in a hilarious segment in which he played a doctor who falls in love with a sheep named Daisy. He is also known for his four films with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak (1976), Stir Crazy (1980), See No Evil, Hear No Evil (1989), and Another You (1991). Wilder directed and wrote several of his own films, including The Woman in Red (1984). His third wife was actress Gilda Radner, with whom he starred in three films. Her death from ovarian cancer led to his active involvement in promoting cancer awareness and treatment, helping found the Gilda Radner Ovarian Cancer Detection Center in Los Angeles[1] and co-founding Gilda’s Club.

After his last contribution to acting in 2003, Wilder turned his attention to writing. He produced a memoir in 2005, Kiss Me Like a Stranger: My Search for Love and Art; a collection of stories, What Is This Thing Called Love? (2010); and the novels My French Whore (2007), The Woman Who Wouldn’t (200 and Something to Remember You By (2013). He is survived by his fourth wife Karen Boyer, whom he married in 1991 and his nephew. His sister Corinne, predeceased him in January 2016.

The Great Divide

When reading for fun, do you usually choose fiction or non-fiction? Do you have an idea why you prefer one over the other?

I tend to mostly stick to fiction and very rarely do I go for a non-fiction book. I like autobiographies and bios as well but the ones I have read are not that many. I remember loving the autobios of Bjorn Borg and Martina Navtratilova (which are co-authored) but still great reads into the minds and lives of big champions.

I don’t think I would much like reading books based on history that much although when I have, I have been engrossed in it. I prefer documentaries and movies based on history. I love stuff like that but reading through it hasn’t always captured my fancy as much as watching it on a screen has. Still it does have it’s charms.

Fiction has always appealed to me, I can get lost in a book and the way the best stories are written. I create the look of each character, building, house and apartment in my mind. The way the characters walk, talk, gesture – everything comes alive in my brain as I have a very active one. That’s kinda why I prefer fiction.

Prompt from The Daily Post at WordPress.com

Morton’s Fork

If you had to choose between being able to write a blog (but not read others’) and being able to read others’ blogs (but not write your own), which would you pick? Why?

Considering the fact that I read so few blogs these days and so rarely, I would chose to be able to write my blog. I get a lot of satisfaction from maintaining it and writing can be such a release. Very therapeutic indeed. So I wouldn’t want to ever not be able to write my own blog posts. Even sharing videos is a form of expression and I need that.

While I used to read a hell of a lot of blogs from 2002 but especially from 2006 to maybe 2013-14 and I do miss that online community feeling of having a set of other bloggers who read and comment on your posts and you do for them, it’s a lot to do with the fact that they have all moved onto Facebook and have neglected their blogs or post very infrequently.

I however have continued at a daily pace and mostly two on a day and just the occasional day that I miss out on blogging. I would pick to be able to write my blog.

Prompt from The Daily Post at WordPress.com

Small Haul From Lulu Mall

I made my first visit to Lulu Mall (the largest mall in India) which is located just 7.5 kms away from me! Yeah, talk about procrastination; it took me almost 3 years to visit it since it opened. Oh well, it is huge and I must have walked a total of 5kms inside the 4 levels but it was fun. I bought a few things for the house (not shown in here) and the rest is for fun.

RIP Jackie Collins

Novelist Jackie Collins, 77, died of breast cancer at her home in Los Angeles. Her family released a statement on the 19th saying “It is with tremendous sadness that we announce the death of our beautiful, dynamic and one-of-a-kind mother”. The British born Collins wrote 32 novels, all of which have appeared on The New York Times bestsellers list. In total, her books have sold over 500 million copies and have been translated into 40 languages. Eight of her novels have been adapted for the screen, either as films or television mini-series. Collins’s career spanned four decades and she sold more than 500 million books in 40 countries. She was the younger sister of actress Joan Collins. Collins was diagnosed with stage-four breast cancer six-and-a-half years ago, according to US celebrity magazine People.

Collins was born in Hampstead, London in 1937, the younger daughter of Elsa Bessant and Joseph William Collins (died 198, a theatrical agent whose clients included Shirley Bassey, the Beatles and Tom Jones. Jackie Collins began writing as a teenager, making up racy stories for her schoolfriends, according to a biography on her website. Her first novel, The World is Full of Married Men, was published in 1968 and became a scandalous bestseller. It was banned in Australia and branded “disgusting” by romance writer Barbara Cartland. Like her sister, Collins began appearing in acting roles in a series of British B movies in the 1950s. She also made appearances in the 1960s ITC television series Danger Man and The Saint before giving up an acting career. Since then, she played herself in a few television series, including Minder in 1980. My favourite book of hers is Rock Star from 1988.

She had kept her illness a secret from everyone except her closest family members. Diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer six-and-a-half years ago, Jackie, 77, chose to keep her illness almost entirely to herself, confiding primarily in her three daughters, Tracy, 54, Tiffany, 48, and Rory, 46. Jackie didn’t even tell Joan until within the last two weeks. Collins married her first husband, Wallace Austin, in 1960 and divorced in 1964. They had one child, Tracy, born in 1961. In 1965, Collins married for the second time to art gallery and nightclub (Ad-Lib, Tramp) owner, Oscar Lerman. The wedding took place in the home of her sister Joan and Anthony Newley, who were married at the time. Collins and Lerman had two daughters, Tiffany (born 1967) and Rory (born 1969). Lerman also formally adopted Collins’ daughter, Tracy, from her previous marriage. Lerman died in 1992 from prostate cancer. In 1994, Collins became engaged to Los Angeles business executive Frank Calcagnini, who died in 1998 from a brain tumour. In the Sunday Times Rich List 2011, Collins was listed as the UK’s fifth richest author with an estimated personal fortune of £60 million ($96 million).

Jacqueline Jill “Jackie” Collins OBE (October 4, 1937 – September 19, 2015)

Two Worlds Collide

Take two main characters from two different books (either fiction or nonfiction) and introduce them to, or have them meet, each other. What would happen next?

Oh this is a hard one to choose as there are so many choices to choose from. So many great characters from so many great books. Forget nonfiction, the characters in fiction are so much more greater and larger than life. I just can’t wrap my head around it.

Well if I had to choose I would pick from ……. Lord of The Rings’s Gandalf and Pennywise the Clown from Stephen’ King’s IT. I would love to watch Gandalf beat the crap outta Pennywise because we know that wizards have better tricks up their sleeve that evil aliens from outer space. Come on Gandalf, nail that ugly ass clown.

It would be epic!

Prompt from The Daily Post at WordPress.com

Fifty Shades Of Grey

Fifty Shades Of Grey is a British-American erotic-romantic film directed by Sam Taylor-Johnson with a screenplay by Kelly Marcel, based on the 2011 novel of the same name by British author E. L. James. It stars Dakota Johnson as Anastasia Steele and Jamie Dornan as Christian Grey and has sadomasochism as a central theme. Supporting roles go to Jennifer Ehle, Eloise Mumford, Dylan Neal, Marcia Gay Haden, Rachel Skartsen & Callum Keith Rennie.

Anastatsia or Ana, an English literature major at Washington State University’s satellite campus near Vancouver, Washington goes to interview 27 year old billionaire business man Christian Grey for her college’s newspaper. Her roommate, Kate Kavanaugh was supposed to do it but fell ill and Ana stepped in as a replacement. After stumbling through the interview at his Seattle headquarters, she seems to have created an interest in Christian who even visits her at the hardware store she works after classes. He also agrees to a photo-shoot for the college paper after which he asks her out for coffee. While talking to Ana, who clearly is smitten with the eligible bachelor, he leaves abruptly saying that he is not the man for her. However he later sends her first editions of her favourite author’s books as a gift.

After Ana graduates she goes out drinking with her friends to celebrate and gets too drunk and calls Christian berating him about his behaviour towards her and says she is returning the books. Concerned he goes to the bar and takes a passed out Ana home to his permanent residence on the top of a large hotel. They soon start seeing each other though Christian says he wants her to sign an NDA preventing her from revealing details about their alliance. Christian explains that he only has interrelations involving bondage that is clearly defined in a signed contract. Ana reveals that she is a virgin. While considering the agreement and negotiating her own terms, she and Christian engage in some of Christian’s desired sexual practices. Christian says she can have her own room and that he won’t go to sleep with her on the same bed after their sexual stuff and that he normally doesn’t go the romantic things like dinner & movies or date nights. But he bestows Ana with gifts and favors, such as a new car and laptop computer.

After their graduation ceremony, where Ana’s dad meets Christian and learns that he is her new boyfriend, Ana and Kate move to Seattle and Ana grows closer to Christian. One night, she accompanies him to his parents’ house. During dinner, Ana suddenly mentions she is leaving the next day to visit her mother in Georgia. Later, Christian becomes frustrated when Ana expresses she wants romance rather than the one-sided relationship he proposes. She is shocked when Christian unexpectedly arrives in Georgia. He leaves soon after to tend to an emergency in Seattle. Once she returns home she moves in with Christian who still wants to experiment sexually and although she takes part in some, Christian remains distant and refuses to become more intimate. He does mention to her that he was introduced to bdsm by a friend of his mother when he was 15 and he played the submissive role to her dominant for 6 years. While still considering the contract, and in an effort to understand Christian psychologically, Ana asks him to demonstrate how he would “punish” her for rule breaking.

Christian whips Ana’s buttocks six times with a belt, making her count out each strike. When he attempts to help her up, she angrily shoves him away, upset and disgusted. It is far from Ana’s romantic expectations, and she leaves after concluding that Christian is wrong for her, despite the fact that she is falling in love with him, and that his practices border on being deviant and excessive. Both are troubled by flashbacks while the film ends abruptly as Christian leaves a business meeting distracted with images of Ana.

I wonder how they participated in such intimate scenes and engaging in BDSM in this movie. I found the movie interesting while slightly disturbing. Even romantic as the endearing Dakota Johnson manages to portay Ana as a character we can root for. 7.5 outta 10 for me!

The Rainmaker

Based on the excellent novel by John Grisham, The Rainmaker is a 1997 movie written and directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Matt Damon & Danny Devito. Danny Glover, Claire Danes, Jon Voight, Roy Scheider, Mickey Rourke, Virginia Madsen, Mary Kay Place & Johnny Whitworth also star. This was the final film appearance of Academy Award-winning actress Teresa Wright.

Damon plays Rudy Baylor, a poor law student waiting to write the bar exams and looking for a job. After his abusive father left him and his mother, Rudy struggled to get by in a poor neighbourhood and worked many shifts in a bar while at law school. With no high paying firm interested in him, he reluctantly goes to an interview with J. Lyman “Bruiser” Stone, a ruthless and corrupt but successful personal injury lawyer, who makes him an associate. To earn his fee, Rudy is turned into an ambulance chaser, required to hunt for potential clients at a local hospital. He meets and joins Deck Shifflet, a less than ethical paralegal who failed the bar 6 times but is resourceful in gathering information, and practically an expert on insurance lawsuits. Rudy has two cases – one a will for a widow, who later also becomes his landlord as he manages to rent the small apartment above her garage- and a bad faith insurance case.

The latter case may be worth several million dollars in damages, which appeals to him because he is about to declare himself bankrupt. While he was studying for the bar in a hospital cafeteria, Rudy meets and becomes friends with Kelly, a young woman who is being battered by her husband. She never presses charges even if the cops know her case well. When Bruiser skips town, after being investigated for racketeering and his offices are raided, Rudy & Deck start their own 2 man law firm with their meager earnings from a couple of cases they worked for Bruiser (and who generously gave them a bonus) They file a bad faith suit on behalf of a middle-aged couple, Dot and Buddy Black, whose 22-year-old son Donny Ray is going to die from leukemia. Donny Ray would most likely have been saved by a bone marrow transplant had his medical claim not been denied by Great Benefit, the family’s insurance carrier. Rudy passes his exams and finds himself up against a group of experienced and devious lawyers from a large firm that is headed by Leo F. Drummond (Jon Voight), a showman attorney who uses unscrupulous tactics to win his cases.

Judge Hale, who is assigned the case is about to dismiss it but dies of a heart attack and the case is reassigned to a more sympathetic judge, Tyrone Kipler who immediately denies the insurance company’s petition for dismissal. After a particularly violent attack, Rudy persuades Kelly, to whom he is attracted, to file for divorce. At Kelly’s home the two pack her bags but are interrupted by her husband Cliff who fights with Rudy, attacking him with a baseball bat. The husband is killed and Kelly takes the blame, telling Rudy to go home and pretend he wasn’t there. To protect Rudy from being implicated in Cliff’s death, Kelly tells the police she killed her husband in self-defense. Rudy promises to defend Kelly if the case goes to trial, but the district attorney declines to prosecute, knowing Kelly would never be convicted. Donny Ray dies, with Rudy equally devastated along with the young man’s parets, but not before giving a video deposition and the case goes to trial, where Drummond capitalizes on Rudy’s inexperience. He gets vital testimony by Rudy’s key witness, former Great Benefit employee Jackie Lemanczyk (Virginia Madsen), stricken from the record, and attempts to discredit Donny Ray’s mother (Mary Kay Place).

Due to Rudy’s single-minded determination and skillful cross-examination of Great Benefit’s unctuous president Wilfred Keeley, the jury finds for the plaintiff with a monetary award far exceeding all expectations. However the jubilation is short lived as Keeley attempts to flee the country and Great Benefit declares itself bankrupt, thus allowing it to avoid paying punitive damages to the Blacks, as well as any future judgments in class-action lawsuits. With no big payout coming, Rudy & Deck won’t get their share Dot Black expresses satisfaction that at least they put Great Benefit out of business, and that it is now unable to hurt other families like hers. Convinced that he can never live up to expectations that future clients will have Rudy leaves his practice to instead teach law with a focus on ethical behavior. He leaves town with Kelly, wanting to retain a low profile and protect Kelly from any possible retribution by Cliff’s vengeful relatives.

Although it is a good film, it never matches the book as a lot of things have to be left out to keep the film at less than the 2 hour mark. I feel that the story suffers from that, even the relationship between Kelly & Rudy isn’t highlighted enough. Still worth a watch. I will give the film a 7.5 outta 10!

Scary Books & Films

Do You Like Scary Movies and Books?

Hell yeah! Have you not seen my past blog posts where I do reviews of horror flicks? Though I must say that this year, with the new job, I haven’t had much chance to watch many movies lately and hence I think I have only seen one horror movie so far in 2015. Yeah but in the summer, now that a lot of the shows that I watch are winding up their seasons, I will have more time to watch movies.

As for books, sure I love to read them but you know what? In the past few years I have stopped reading books as I find that I am engrossed in stuff like Youtube and Facebook and Twitter and find reading a lot more tedious and hence can’t finish a book. It is a bit annoying that I can’t concentrate and commit to finishing a book in a week or two whereas I used to devour books at rates of like 3 in a week up till 2008. The internet is too much of a distraction I tell ya!

I think I need to set aside a week or so, get some of my vacation time and find a quite place to lay low for a few days and read a few books. I miss books.

Prompt from The Learning Network from The New York Times

“The Things I Do for Love”: George R.R. Martin’s Inspiration for Game of Thrones

Episodes of the insanely popular television series Game of Thrones would have never reached the limelight if it weren’t for the book that inspired them: A Song of Ice and Fire. George R.R. Martin published the first book in the series back in 1996 but actually started writing it five years prior in 1991 (of course, he is now known for his incredibly slow pace in releasing his novels). Martin had only fairly recently become famous for the series when the television adaption had premiered in 2011, when it received praise from nearly everyone who watched it. Now in its fifth season, now is as good a time as any to look back at Martin’s original novels and what inspired them.

A Song of Ice and Fire is action-packed, political, and most of all, fantasy-driven. With dragons, magic, and sorcery, it is not at all a surprise that Martin was inspired by a handful of other fantasy authors. Perhaps one of the most obvious among them is J. R.R. Tolkien, the father of all things fantasy. His work is still as relevant and popular today as ever, with the latest Hobbit having just premiered last December. Martin draws from Tolkien’s use of magical and fantasy elements, as well as his focus on strong characters and storyline.In addition to this, Martin splits up his characters as Tolkien did in The Lord of the Rings. We see family and friends start off on adventures together, but they soon separate to have journeys all their own.

Perhaps less-known is the inspiration Martin draws from other fantasy authors such as T. H. White and Robert E. Howard who were famous for the King Arthur and Conan the Barbarian stories, respectively. From Howard, sorcery and swordsmanship is brought to life just as it is in A Song of Ice and Fire and Game of Thrones. Martin also borrows from Howard’s work the idea of a hero along with the same elements he grabs from Tolkien and White.

In addition to these fantasy writers, Martin was inspired by real historical events in his writing as well. GoT’s Red Wedding was a retelling of both the Black Dinner and the Glencoe Massacre, which happened in the 1400’s and 1600’s in Scotland. The Black Dinner revolved around the murder of the 6th Earl of Douglas, who was only 16 at the time, and his younger brother David. They were invited to dinner with the King of Scotland but were dragged outside and given a trial in the middle of their meal. When they were found guilty of high treason, they were both beheaded.

In the Glencoe Massacre, 38 people from the Clan Macdonald were murdered by the Campbells in their sleep, a separate clan who sought shelter from the Macdonalds. This event was deemed a “Slaughter Under Trust,” much like The Red Wedding.

Other aspects of history also inspired Martin’s fantasy writing, such as Hadrian’s Wall or Roman Wall in Scotland, which inspired the Wall in A Song of Ice and Fire, and the War of Roses in which houses fought for the throne of England. Sound familiar?

Despite what has inspired one of the most famous novels and show to date, Martin created a world in which we are able to escape to and have adventures in. His inspirations, the writers that came before him, and the history that predates us all have all made for an incredible and thought-provoking series. With the fifth season only just beginning (look at this resource for listings), we are sure to be in for a fantasy-filled journey.

~ guest blog written by Emma! (connect to her via @emma_bailey90)

Ghostwriter

If I could pick an author to write my biography then I would pick Stephen King. Hands down my favourite author of all time and the author of my favourite novel of all time, IT, he would do an amazing job of making my miserable life seem interesting enough that people would want to pick up a book on it and read.

He would make it seem even more fascinating that it ever could be and jazz it up to a great extent that even I wouldn’t recognise it as being about my own life. He would include ghosts, goblins, evil twins, fantastic landscapes, werewolves, vampires, creepy creatures, even an alien or two and a scary ghost house. He would make you laugh at the funny bit, scare you silly at the gory, horror scenes and gross you out with describing in great detail the mess, puke, bile and shit! All made up ofcourse

And it will also be sad in parts; lost loves and longing, old friendships and parting ways and remorse and regret and pain. And a melancholic strain that refuses to go away. So yeah, Mr. Kings’s latest book is a sure best seller!