1 Book Or 1 Show

Would you rather read only one book for a year or only watch one television show for a year, and which book or show would you pick?

I don’t think it’s possible for me to pick just one book to read for an entire year. Besides I don’t read that many books these days and despite having been a voracious reader for most of my life, up until the age of 33. Nowdays if I do get to read a book it takes several weeks for me to get through it, whereas I used to read 10 books in a few days. But I guess I will pick It by Stephen King since it’s my favourite and it’s pretty lengthy.

Tv show – if I had to pick just one tv show that I can watch for an entire year and cannot watch another, I guess I could go the easy route and select a long running show like Supernatural (13 seasons and still going strong), Bones (12), CSI (15) or Stargate SG-1 which ran for 10 seasons plus 2 tv movies. But I will go with Star Trek TNG both for content and variation in their themes and stories. It ran for 7 seasons and, I guess we can’t include the 4 theatrical films, but it offers a whole lot more episodes.

Unless I cheat there and just say Star Trek which means, 3 seasons of TOS, 7 of TNG, 7 of Deep Space Nine, 7 of Voyager, 4 of Enterprise and 1 season of Discovery (which is currently ongoing).

Prompt from 31 DAYS OF WRITING PROMPTS FOR AUGUST at The SitsGirls

ROSHAN’S ELEVEN : Stephen King Movie Adaptations

This here is my little ole list of top & favourite movie adaptations of Stephen King’s novels, novellas, short stories or his original script work. I haven’t watched all of them so this is based on just what I have seen. This list may change depending on when and if I do watch more of them. So here goes:

  • It (2017 & the mini-series)
  • Carrie (1976)
  • The Mist
  • The Green Mile
  • Shawshank Redemptions
  • Pet Semetary
  • Cujo
  • Dolores Clairborne
  • Thinner
  • The Running Man
  • Apt Pupil

Kid’s Books

What were your three favorite children’s books when you were a kid?

Hmmm, I read a lot of comics as a kid. I read a lot period throughout my childhood uptil the age of 30-32 I guess. And that stopped because of broadband internet and especially Youtube taking over my life. But if I were to look back and see which were my favourite books:

  1. Huckelberry Finn
  2. Gulliver’s Travels
  3. Robinson Crusoe

I am not sure that you can qualify them as children’s books but I read the illustrated versions of these books by the age of 10 and I loved them all.

Prompt from 30 DAYS OF APRIL WRITING PROMPTS at the SitsGirls

Murder on the Orient Express (2017)

Murder on the Orient Express is a 2017 mystery drama film directed by Kenneth Branagh with a screenplay by Michael Green, based on the 1934 novel of the same name by Agatha Christie. The film stars Branagh as Hercule Poirot, with Penélope Cruz, Willem Dafoe, Judi Dench, Johnny Depp, Josh Gad, Derek Jacobi, Leslie Odom Jr., Michelle Pfeiffer, and Daisy Ridley in supporting roles. The film is the fourth screen adaptation of Christie’s novel, following the 1974 film, a 2001 TV film version, and a 2010 episode of the television series Agatha Christie’s Poirot.

After solving a theft at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, wants to have some time off and rest in Istanbul. However he is called for a case in London and his friend Bouc, the director of the Orient Express, offers a room aboard the train. While in the train, American businessman Edward Ratchett offers to pay Poirot to be his bodyguard, thinking the Belgian’s detecting skills should protect him against possible assassins, but Poirot politely refuses. That night, Poirot hears strange noises coming from Ratchett’s compartment, and later sees someone in a red kimono running down the hallway. An avalanche derails the train’s engine, stranding the passengers.

The next morning Ratchett is discovered to have been murdered sometime during the night as his body is found with a dozen stabs. Bouc asks Poirot to help solve the case. Poirot discovers a partially burned note connecting Ratchett to the kidnapping of Daisy Armstrong, a child who was abducted from her bedroom and held for ransom. After the ransom was paid, Daisy was found murdered. Ratchett’s true identity is revealed: he was John Cassetti, Daisy’s kidnapper and murderer. The shock of her death caused her mother Sonia to die after giving premature birth to a stillborn baby; her father, Colonel Armstrong, then committed suicide. The family’s nursemaid Susanne was wrongly suspected of complicity, leading to her being arrested and she hanged herself while in police custody, only to be found innocent afterwards.

After conducting his individual interviews and being shot at, Poirot meets the suspects outside the train, offering two theories of how Cassetti died. The first is simple: A murderer disguised as a conductor boarded the train, murdered Cassetti, and fled. The second is more complex: every suspect is connected to the Armstrongs, Susanne, or her trial in some way—including those who had pretended otherwise—and had motive to kill Cassetti. Hubbard is revealed to be Linda Arden, a former stage actress, and Sonia Armstrong’s mother. She admits to hiring everyone else to be on the Orient Express and all of them took their turns to stab Cassetti.

Poirot challenges the passengers and Michel to shoot him with Arbuthnot’s gun, since he is the only one who can expose their plot; Bouc can lie, but Poirot, obsessed with truth and balance, cannot. Hubbard grabs the gun and tries to kill herself, but it is not loaded; Poirot wanted to see how the suspects would react. With the train back on track, Poirot concludes that justice is impossible in the case, as Cassetti deserved death; for the first time, Poirot will have to live with a lie, and imbalance. He presents the lone killer theory to the Yugoslavian police, allowing the others to leave on the train. As he disembarks, a messenger asks him to investigate a death on the Nile. Poirot takes the case.

It was ok though the movie did not have the style and panache of the original, which I had seen many years ago. The focus is way too much on Kenneth Branagh as Poirot and the movie does plod along a bit. The production though is stylish and gorgeous. 7.5 outta 10!

The Chamber (1996)

The Chamber is a 1996 crime thriller film based on John Grisham’s novel of the same name. The film was directed by James Foleyand stars Gene Hackman, Faye Dunaway and Chris O’Donnell. Among the supporting staff are Robert Prosky, Raymond J Barry & Lela Rochon.

The book is a big favorite of mine. The story is about Klansman Sam Cayhall (played by Gene Hackman) who is tried and found guilty of bombing the office of Marvin Kramer, a Jewish civil rights lawyer in Indianola, Mississippi, in 1967, killing Kramer’s five-year-old twin boys and leading to the amputation of Kramer’s legs and his later suicide. After two mistrials Sam is tried again for murder in the bombing, and is eventually convicted and sentenced to die in the gas chamber at the Mississippi State Penitentiary. Enter Adam Hall.

Now without a lawyer, Sam becomes a pro bono case for a team of anti-death penalty lawyers from the large — and ironically Jewish — Chicago law firm of Kravitz and Bane. Representing Sam is his own grandson, Adam Hall, who travels to the firm’s Memphis office to aid Sam in the final month before his scheduled execution. Although lacking experience in death penalty cases, Adam is determined to argue a stay for his grandfather. Sam, despite his violent past, is one of the few living links to Adam’s family history. Sam’s alcoholicdaughter, Lee Cayhall Booth, slowly reveals the family’s tragic past to her nephew, Adam.

As Adam tries to find a way to stay the execution he learns that Sam was actually the accomplice. Before the Kramer bombing, Sam usually used very basic bombing and planned them to minimize damage and not to kill but only to serve as a warning. Rollie Wedge, was the bomb expert and timed the bombing so that Kramer would be at the office at the time; the two sons were there only because their mother was ill. Sam refuses to coroborate this new evidence as he took an oath of loyalty to the Klan. At the same time, Lee, faced with the unearthed ghosts of the family history and having lapsed back into full-blown alcoholism, reveals to Adam that in the early 1950s, as children, she and Adam’s father had witnessed their father murder the family’s African-American neighbor, Joe Lincoln, during a fight that had started because Adam’s father, Eddie, had wrongly accused Lincoln’s son of stealing a toy soldier.

Eddie had blamed himself for the murder, as well as Lee, for failing to stop Sam, the guilt of which was a factor in Eddie’s later suicide and Lee’s alcoholism. Lee also reveals how their father had been indoctrinated into the Klan as a child, showing Adam an historic photograph of Sam as a young boy attending a Klan lynching. Wedge has his men beat up Adam when the young lawyer comes questioning but the Klansman is later arrested by the cops. Adam’s motions for a stay are denied by the courts, including the United States Supreme Court. Despite Sam’s finally authorizing the release of relevant Sovereignty Commission files, the Governor refuses to grant clemency. Sam is executed in the gas chamber, though Adam remains as a confidant and advocate for his grandfather up until his execution, and he and Lee embrace at the end, in the hope that maybe the ghosts of the past are gone.

There are several changes from the book though not for the better. The film is too short to make a compelling story and it suffers greatly due to that. I give it a 7 outta 10!

Runaway Jury

Runaway Jury is a 2003 American legal thriller film directed by Gary Fleder and starring John Cusack, Gene Hackman, Dustin Hoffman, and Rachel Weisz. It is an adaptation of John Grisham’s 1996 novel The Runaway Jury. Also starring in the movie are Jeremy Piven, Bruce Davison, Bruce McGill, Marguerite Moreau & Jennifer Beals in supporting roles.

The book is always better than the movie in most cases and it certainly is the case over here but having said that, I must admit that the movie is certainly watchable though not too exciting. But they do have a stellar cast which more than makes up for the lack of excitement. In New Orleans, a failed day trader at a stock brokerage firm shows up at the office and opens fire on his former colleagues, then kills himself. Among the dead is Jacob Wood. Two years later, with attorney Wendell Rohr, Jacob’s widow Celeste takes Vicksburg Firearms to court on the grounds that the company’s gross negligence led to her husband’s death.

During jury selection, jury consultant Rankin Fitch and his team communicate background information on each of the jurors to lead defense attorney Durwood Cable in the courtroom through electronic surveillance. But one of the jurors, Nick Easter, who is initially rejected is brought back in to the notice of Fitch and his team as he tries to get himself excused from jury duty. Judge Frederick Harkin decides to give Nick a lesson in civic duty and Fitch tells Cable that the judge has now given them no choice, and that he must select Nick as a juror. Nick uses his easy going and congenial manner to win over and influence several of the jurors with one exception. Marlee, who Nick is working with, contacts Fitch and Rohr: she will deliver the verdict to the first bidder.

What happens next is some brilliant planning and scheming by Marlee and Nick as they showcase their power and influence over the rest of the jurors by selecting a foreman and making the jurors do other things. itch orders Nick’s apartment searched, but finds nothing. Marlee retaliates by getting one of Fitch’s jurors bounced. Nick shows the judge surveillance footage of his apartment being searched, and the judge orders the jury sequestered. Fitch then goes after three jurors with blackmail, leading one, Rikki Coleman, to attempt suicide. Rohr loses a key witness due to harassment, and after confronting Fitch, decides that he cannot win the case. He asks his firm’s partners for $10 million. Fitch sends an operative, Janovich, to kidnap Marlee, but she fights him off and raises Fitch’s price to $15 million. On principle, Rohr changes his mind and refuses to pay. Fitch agrees to pay Marlee to be certain of the verdict.

One of Fitch’s men tracks down Nick’s real name and also Marlee’s hometown and meets her mother Nick is really Jeff Kerr, a law school drop-out, and that Marlee’s real name is Gabby Brandt. Gabby’s sister died in a school shooting. The town sued the gun manufacturer and Fitch helped the defense win the case. Doyle concludes that Nick and Marlee’s offer is a set-up, and he calls Fitch, but it is too late. The gun manufacturer is found liable, with the jury awarding $110 million in general damages to Celeste Wood. After the trial, Nick and Marlee confront Fitch with a receipt for the $15 million bribe and demand that he retire. They inform him that the $15 million will benefit the shooting victims in Gardner.

Though the plot is brilliant and the cast is very good, the shorter time for a movie makes the rather entertaining story from the book a little wasted in the movie. This happens quite a lot. I will give the movie a solid 7 outta 10!

Childhood Reading Pleasures

What was your favorite book as a child? If you have kids, do your children love it as much as you did?

I don’t think I had one favourite book as a kid. I read a lot and I read a lot of books. I read Amar Chitra Katha, Tinkle, Archies, Super hero – DC & Marvel and a lot of Indrajal comics (Phantom, Mandrake, Dick Kirby etc) and a bunch of others. Among my favourites were Nancy Drew, The Famous Five and the Hardy Boys books. Those were cool for that age man. I wouldn’t want to read them now as I would find them boring now; but as a kid those stories was awesome.

There is one more such teenage detective story series but the name escapes me. I remember reading a few of their books as well and enjoyed them as well. Actually, now that I recall there was one book which I read over and over again. That would be Robinson Crusoe! I remember devouring that book – with images and dialogue bubbles as well – and atleast 20 or more times. I dunno why but that story spoke to me.

From the same publishers I also got The Prisoner of Zenda and that too was a book I read a lot from the age of 8 to 12. Enjoyable as heck!

Prompt from 30 DAYS OF NOVEMBER WRITING PROMPTS at the SitsGirls

The Novel That Never Was

Do You Want to Write a Book?

Yes. Once upon a time, I always envisioned that I would end up writing atleast one book which will get published, maybe more. So far no go.

But there was a time when I did write 13 chapters of this idea for a novel I had. It was a scifi concept of a guy who befriends a scientist/inventor who disappears and our protagonist investigates. When he finds the scientist’s secret lab hidden under the latter’s garage he stumbles onto a large device that transports him into an alternate universe – one in which after two more world wars, men are rare and women dominate the planet.

The women keep men as slaves, for labour alliance and leicester loan and for sex, and there are tussles between women in power to keep their quota of slaves. One man is shared by several women, who have assumed a post-apocalyptic military lifestyle. Our protagonist is found and enslaved but uses his wits to keep himself at the top of the slave chain and he doesn’t have to do much physical labour due to his smarts being used to help the women in command.

At one point – had I finished the novel – he would have escaped with a few women who are more gentle and kind and take a boat off to an island where they can live in peace with other like-minded men and women. But I never got that far.

Prompt from The Learning Network at The New York Times

RIP Hugh Hefner

Hugh Hefner, who created Playboy magazine and spun it into a media and entertainment-industry giant — all the while, as its very public avatar, squiring attractive young women (and sometimes marrying them) well into his 80s — died on Wednesday at his home, the Playboy Mansion near Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 91. His death was announced by Playboy Enterprises. Hefner was a stunning success from his emergence in the early 1950s. His timing was perfect.

The first issue of Playboy was published in 1953, when Mr. Hefner was 27 years old, a new father married to, by his account, the first woman he had slept with. The first issue of Playboy was financed with $600 of his own money and several thousand more in borrowed funds, including $1,000 from his mother. But his biggest asset was a nude calendar photograph of Marilyn Monroe. He had bought the rights for $500. He had only recently moved out of his parents’ house and left his job at Children’s Activities magazine. Mr. Hefner was reviled, first by guardians of the 1950s social order — J. Edgar Hoover among them — and later by feminists. But Playboy’s circulation reached one million by 1960 and peaked at about seven million in the 1970s.

Long after other publishers made the nude “Playmate” centerfold look more sugary than daring, Playboy remained the most successful men’s magazine in the world. Hefner’s company branched into movie, cable and digital production, sold its own line of clothing and jewelry, and opened clubs, resorts and casinos. The brand faded over the years, and by 2015 the magazine’s circulation had dropped to about 800,000 — although among men’s magazines it was outsold by only one, Maxim, which was founded in 1995. Hefner remained editor in chief even after agreeing to the magazine’s startling decision in 2015 to stop publishing nude photographs. Mr. Hefner handed over creative control of Playboy last year to his son Cooper Hefner. He admitted to being “‘involved’ with maybe eleven out of twelve months’ worth of Playmates” during some of these years.

Hefner had a minor stroke in 1985 at the age of 59. After re-evaluating his lifestyle, he made several changes. The wild, all-night parties were toned down significantly and in 1988, daughter Christie began to run the Playboy empire. The following year, he married Playmate of the Year Kimberley Conrad; they were 36 years apart in age. The couple had two sons: Marston Glenn (born 1990) and Cooper Bradford (born 1991). In January 2009, Hefner started dating Crystal Harris, joining the Shannon Twins after his previous “number one girlfriend”, Holly Madison, had ended their seven-year relationship. On December 24, 2010, he became engaged to Harris, to become his third wife. Harris broke off their engagement on June 14, 2011, five days before their planned wedding. The two later reconciled, and on December 31, 2012, Harris and Hefner married at the Playboy Mansion in a small private ceremony; he was 86 and she was 26.

Off The Shelf

Take a look at your bookcase. If you had enough free time, which book would be the first one you’d like to reread? Why?

Definitely Stephen King’s IT. This has been stated before in this blog – IT is my favourite novel of all time. It is enormous and it is thrilling and it is touching. And it has everything in it – horror, humour, love, sex, friendships, loyalty, family, sadness, loneliness and standing up against bullying, whether it is by a human being or by something that is supernatural.

I have read the book several times but not in the last 5 years or more. I first watch the mini-series as a 15 year old kid and then got the book at the library to read a year or so later and read it in 2 days without doing much else other than eating, drinking and sleeping in between. The book was compelling and I could barely put it down for doing other stuff. I rarely find the time to read anymore as well, during my spare time, I am always online or watching a tv series or a movie. Who has the time for books?

But this book which I keep above all else – I have a copy and it is dog eared – is my favourite still. I will always treasure it.

Prompt from The Daily Post at WordPress.com

Read Out

Take a look at your bookcase. If you had enough free time, which book would be the first one you’d like to reread? Why?

Well, I’m gonna change this up a bit. It’s not a book I haven finished reading yet but it’s a book that I started to read and reached about a quarter of the way through. I’m talking about the first book in the A Song Of Ice & Fire series : Game of Thrones. I picked up the novel last year but I have only managed to reach about a quarter of it. Mind you, I have seen the first 6 seasons of the tv show and am a big fan of them. The books however, I haven’t even managed to put a dent in them.

The whole problem is because the series is so awesome and gives you such a wonderful viewing experience, which is something I love, getting into the books or atleast the first book, has been tough. Also I don’t spend as much as I used to on reading books. I devoured books for many years, reading and rereading them a lot. But Youtube has pretty much rendered me dead to most other stuff. Except ofcourse real tv shows and movies. Thus I have barely read any books in the last….3 years or so!

I know it’s a shame but I just can’t bring myself to dedicate sometime for some book reading anymore. I guess I will eventually get back to it someday. Just not in the near future.

Prompt from The Daily Post at WordPress.com

RIP Gene Wilder

Gene Wilder, who regularly stole the show in such comedic gems as “The Producers,” “Blazing Saddles,” “Young Frankenstein,” “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” and “Stir Crazy,” died Monday at his home in Stamford, Conn. His nephew Jordan Walker-Pearlman said he died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease. He was 83. He had been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 1989.

The comic actor, who was twice Oscar nominated, for his role in “The Producers” and for co-penning “Young Frankenstein” with Mel Brooks, usually portrayed a neurotic who veered between total hysteria and dewy-eyed tenderness. “My quiet exterior used to be a mask for hysteria,” he told Time magazine in 1970. “After seven years of analysis, it just became a habit.” Habit or not, he got a great deal of mileage out of his persona in the 1970s for directors like Mel Brooks and Woody Allen, leading to a few less successful stints behind the camera, the best of which was “The Woman in Red,” co-starring then-wife Gilda Radner. Wilder was devastated by Radner’s death from ovarian cancer in 1989 and worked only intermittently after that. He tried his hand briefly at a sitcom in 1994, “Something Wilder,” and won an Emmy in 2003 for a guest role on “Will & Grace.”

In 1971 he stepped into the shoes of Willy Wonka, one of his most beloved and gentle characters. Based on the children’s book by Roald Dahl, “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” was not an immediate hit but became a children’s favorite over the years. The same cannot be said for the 1974 Stanley Donen-directed musical version of “The Little Prince,” in which Wilder appeared as the fox. He had somewhat better luck in Woody Allen’s spoof “Everything You Wanted to Know About Sex,” appearing in a hilarious segment in which he played a doctor who falls in love with a sheep named Daisy. He is also known for his four films with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak (1976), Stir Crazy (1980), See No Evil, Hear No Evil (1989), and Another You (1991). Wilder directed and wrote several of his own films, including The Woman in Red (1984). His third wife was actress Gilda Radner, with whom he starred in three films. Her death from ovarian cancer led to his active involvement in promoting cancer awareness and treatment, helping found the Gilda Radner Ovarian Cancer Detection Center in Los Angeles[1] and co-founding Gilda’s Club.

After his last contribution to acting in 2003, Wilder turned his attention to writing. He produced a memoir in 2005, Kiss Me Like a Stranger: My Search for Love and Art; a collection of stories, What Is This Thing Called Love? (2010); and the novels My French Whore (2007), The Woman Who Wouldn’t (200 and Something to Remember You By (2013). He is survived by his fourth wife Karen Boyer, whom he married in 1991 and his nephew. His sister Corinne, predeceased him in January 2016.

The Great Divide

When reading for fun, do you usually choose fiction or non-fiction? Do you have an idea why you prefer one over the other?

I tend to mostly stick to fiction and very rarely do I go for a non-fiction book. I like autobiographies and bios as well but the ones I have read are not that many. I remember loving the autobios of Bjorn Borg and Martina Navtratilova (which are co-authored) but still great reads into the minds and lives of big champions.

I don’t think I would much like reading books based on history that much although when I have, I have been engrossed in it. I prefer documentaries and movies based on history. I love stuff like that but reading through it hasn’t always captured my fancy as much as watching it on a screen has. Still it does have it’s charms.

Fiction has always appealed to me, I can get lost in a book and the way the best stories are written. I create the look of each character, building, house and apartment in my mind. The way the characters walk, talk, gesture – everything comes alive in my brain as I have a very active one. That’s kinda why I prefer fiction.

Prompt from The Daily Post at WordPress.com

Morton’s Fork

If you had to choose between being able to write a blog (but not read others’) and being able to read others’ blogs (but not write your own), which would you pick? Why?

Considering the fact that I read so few blogs these days and so rarely, I would chose to be able to write my blog. I get a lot of satisfaction from maintaining it and writing can be such a release. Very therapeutic indeed. So I wouldn’t want to ever not be able to write my own blog posts. Even sharing videos is a form of expression and I need that.

While I used to read a hell of a lot of blogs from 2002 but especially from 2006 to maybe 2013-14 and I do miss that online community feeling of having a set of other bloggers who read and comment on your posts and you do for them, it’s a lot to do with the fact that they have all moved onto Facebook and have neglected their blogs or post very infrequently.

I however have continued at a daily pace and mostly two on a day and just the occasional day that I miss out on blogging. I would pick to be able to write my blog.

Prompt from The Daily Post at WordPress.com

Small Haul From Lulu Mall

I made my first visit to Lulu Mall (the largest mall in India) which is located just 7.5 kms away from me! Yeah, talk about procrastination; it took me almost 3 years to visit it since it opened. Oh well, it is huge and I must have walked a total of 5kms inside the 4 levels but it was fun. I bought a few things for the house (not shown in here) and the rest is for fun.

RIP Jackie Collins

Novelist Jackie Collins, 77, died of breast cancer at her home in Los Angeles. Her family released a statement on the 19th saying “It is with tremendous sadness that we announce the death of our beautiful, dynamic and one-of-a-kind mother”. The British born Collins wrote 32 novels, all of which have appeared on The New York Times bestsellers list. In total, her books have sold over 500 million copies and have been translated into 40 languages. Eight of her novels have been adapted for the screen, either as films or television mini-series. Collins’s career spanned four decades and she sold more than 500 million books in 40 countries. She was the younger sister of actress Joan Collins. Collins was diagnosed with stage-four breast cancer six-and-a-half years ago, according to US celebrity magazine People.

Collins was born in Hampstead, London in 1937, the younger daughter of Elsa Bessant purpose loan and Joseph William Collins (died 198, a theatrical agent whose clients included Shirley Bassey, the Beatles and Tom Jones. Jackie Collins began writing as a teenager, making up racy stories for her schoolfriends, according to a biography on her website. Her first novel, The World is unsecured payday loan Full of Married Men, was published in 1968 and became a scandalous bestseller. It was banned in Australia and branded “disgusting” by romance writer Barbara Cartland. Like her sister, Collins began appearing in acting roles in a series of British B movies in the 1950s. She also made appearances in the 1960s ITC television series Danger Man and The Saint before giving up an acting career. Since then, she played herself in a few television series, including Minder in 1980. My favourite book of hers is Rock Star from 1988.

She had kept her illness a secret from everyone except her closest family members. Diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer six-and-a-half years ago, Jackie, 77, chose to keep her illness almost entirely to herself, confiding primarily in her three daughters, Tracy, 54, Tiffany, 48, and Rory, 46. Jackie didn’t even tell Joan until within the last two weeks. Collins married her first husband, Wallace Austin, in 1960 and divorced in 1964. They had one child, Tracy, born in 1961. In 1965, Collins married for the second time to art gallery and nightclub (Ad-Lib, Tramp) owner, Oscar Lerman. The wedding took place in the home of her sister Joan and Anthony Newley, who were married at the time. Collins and Lerman had two daughters, Tiffany (born 1967) and Rory (born 1969). Lerman also formally adopted Collins’ daughter, Tracy, from her previous marriage. Lerman died in 1992 from prostate cancer. In 1994, Collins became engaged to Los Angeles business executive Frank Calcagnini, who died in 1998 from a brain tumour. In the Sunday Times Rich List 2011, Collins was listed as the UK’s fifth richest author with an estimated personal fortune of £60 million ($96 million).

Jacqueline Jill “Jackie” internet loads Collins OBE (October 4, 1937 – September 19, 2015)