Zombi 2

Zombi 2 is a 1979 Italian zombie film directed by Lucio Fulci. It was adapted from an original screenplay by Dardano Sacchetti to serve as a sequel to George A. Romero’s Dawn of the Dead (1978), which was released in Italy with the title Zombi. It stars Tisa Farrow, Ian McCulloch, and Richard Johnson, and features a score by frequent Fulci collaborator Fabio Frizzi. Frizzi’s score has been released independently of the film, and he has performed it live on tour.

The film tells the story of a Caribbean island cursed by voodoo whose dead residents rise as zombies to attack the living. A scientist’s daughter journeys to the island after her father’s boat turns up abandoned in New York City. Intended by its writer as a return to “classic zombie tales”, Zombi 2 was filmed in Italy, with further location shooting in New York and Santo Domingo.

The Ruins

The Ruins is a 2008 supernatural horror film directed by Carter Smith which stars Jonathan Tucker, Jena Malone, Shawn Ashmore, Laura Ramsey, and Joe Anderson. An international co-production between the United States and Australia, it is based on the 2006 novel of the same name by Scott Smith, who also wrote the screenplay.

Trick ‘r Treat

Trick ‘r Treat is a 2007 American anthology horror comedy film written and directed by Michael Dougherty and produced by Bryan Singer. The film stars Dylan Baker, Rochelle Aytes, Anna Paquin and Brian Cox. It relates four Halloween horror stories with a common element in them, Sam; a mysterious child trick-or-treater wearing shabby orange footie pajamas with a burlap sack over his head. The character makes an appearance in each of the stories whenever one of the other characters breaks a Halloween tradition.

Mind Your Language’s Swedish Bombshell

Anna Bergman comes from a talented Swedish family.  former Swedish actress. She is the daughter of film and theatre director Ingmar Bergman and choreographer-director Ellen Lundström, sister to Eva (film, theatre, and television director), Jan, and actor Mats Bergman (twin); and half-sister to Daniel Bergman, a film director, and a Norwegian author and journalist Linn Ullmann.

Bergman mostly appeared as a performer in several British sex comedies during the late 1970s including the title role in Penelope Pulls It Off (1975), Adventures of a Taxi Driver (1976), Intimate Games (1976), Come Play with Me (1977) and What’s Up Superdoc! (1978), though later she appeared in small roles in more mainstream films including The Wild Geese (1978), Licensed to Love and Kill (1979), Nutcracker (1982), and her father’s 1982 film Fanny and Alexander. She also appeared as Swedish au pair Ingrid Svenson in seasons 2 and 4 of the British situation comedy Mind Your Language.

Perhaps most known for her appearances on Mind your Language as Ingrid Svenson (Series 2 and 4), a Swedish au pair who joins the class at the beginning of series 2. She is attractive and straightforward about her attraction to Mr Brown, sparking a rivalry between her and Danielle. Her main problem with English is word order, often getting words mixed up, such as “you for I question answer”. She transfers schools at the end of Series 2, but returns in the independently produced Series 4.

Smokey And The Bandit

Smokey and the Bandit is a 1977 American road action comedy film starring Burt Reynolds, Sally Field, Jackie Gleason, Jerry Reed, Pat McCormick, Paul Williams and Mike Henry. The directorial debut of stuntman Hal Needham, the film follows Bo “Bandit” Darville (Reynolds) and Cledus “Snowman” Snow (Reed), two bootleggers attempting to illegally transport 400 cases of Coors beer from Texarkana to Atlanta. While the Snowman drives the truck carrying the beer, the Bandit drives a Pontiac Trans Am to distract law enforcement (called blocking) and keep the attention off the Snowman. During their run, they are pursued by Texas county sheriff Buford T. Justice (Gleason). Smokey and the Bandit was the second highest-grossing domestic film of 1977, with $300 million against a budget of $4.3 million (only Star Wars made a higher gross that year, earning $775.5 million). Sally Field and Burt Reynolds began a relationship after meeting on set.

The Taking of Deborah Logan

The Taking of Deborah Logan is a 2014 American found footage supernatural horror film. It is the feature film directorial debut of Adam Robitel, who co-wrote the screenplay and edited the film with Gavin Heffernan. The film stars Jill Larson, Anne Ramsay, and Michelle Ang. Set in Virginia, it tells the story of a documentary crew making a film about Alzheimer’s patients who uncover something sinister while documenting a woman who has the disease. The film was produced by Jeff Rice and Bryan Singer and was released on October 21, 2014.

ROSHAN’S ELEVEN : Romantic Movies

So, it’s that time of the year again. Valentine’s Day is up next Sunday and the stupid posts on Facebook about it being manufactured (like your religious holidays, right?) is upon us. I don’t care; there is something special about dedicating a day to love.  This is my list and I have not yet watched a few movies that are famous so for the time being this is my list.

  • You’ve Got Mail
  • Ghost
  • The Notebook
  • Titanic
  • LA LA Land
  • Pretty Woman
  • Before Sunset
  • Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
  • Casablanca
  • The Shape of Water
  • Knocked Up

RIP Christopher Plummer

Christopher Plummer, the Canadian-born Shakespearean actor who starred in films including “The Sound of Music” and “Beginners,” died on Friday morning at his home in Connecticut. He was 91. An imposing theatrical presence with a well-cultivated, resonant voice, that critic John Simon once observed, “in its chamois mode, can polish mirrors,” Plummer was best known for playing Captain von Trapp in the Oscar-winning musical “The Sound of Music.” He also won an Oscar in 2012 for his supporting turn in the film “Beginners,” becoming the oldest actor ever to win the Academy Award for supporting actor. 

Born Arthur Christopher Orme Plummer in Toronto, he grew up in Montreal, where he attended the Jennings Private School. He made his stage debut in a 1948 production of “Cymbeline” at the Canadian Repertory Theatre in Ottawa, followed soon thereafter by a CBC television production of “Othello.” After migrating to New York in the early ’50s, he worked extensively in live television on such shows as “Kraft Television Theatre,” “Hallmark Hall of Fame,” “Producers’ Showcase,” “Appointment With Adventure” and “Omnibus.”

He had a long and acclaimed career on stage, with two Tony Awards. In films, he was also known for “The Insider,” “12 Monkeys,” “Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country” (where he played a Shakespear quoting Klingon, General Chang – one of the best villains in Trek) and “A Beautiful Mind,” and he contributed voices for “Up,” “An American Tale” and the “Madeline” TV series. His first serious critical acclaim came for his rebel-with-a-cause interpretation of “Henry V” at the Stratford Festival in 1956. He triumphed as Iago opposite James Earl Jones in “Othello” on Broadway in the early ’80s, as well as in “Macbeth” opposite Glenda Jackson.

Plummer was in demand as a character actor in high-profile films, appearing in a wide variety of material, from The Royal Hunt of the Sun and The Battle of Britain in 1969, to Sergei Bondarchuk’s epic Waterloo (1970) and Return of the Pink Panther (1975). He played Rudyard Kipling in The Man Who Would Be King and Sherlock Holmes in Murder By Decree (1979). 

Other high points included “The Royal Hunt of the Sun” and a revival of Harold Pinter’s “No Man’s Land” alongside Jason Robards. He won his first Tony Award in 1974 for the musical “Cyrano” and a second in 1996 for “Barrymore,” based on the life of actor John Barrymore. In his later years, he scored in character and supporting roles, including his well-regarded portrayal of “60 Minutes” newsman Mike Wallace in Michael Mann’s film “The Insider” and as Franklin Delano Roosevelt in HBO telepic “Winchell,” directed by Paul Mazursky. He picked up an Emmy for miniseries “The Moneychangers” and another for his narration of the children’s special “Madeline.”

In 2015, he starred in Remember, directed by Atom Egoyan and in 2017 The Exception, based on the novel The Kaiser’s Last Kiss co-starring Lily James, Jai Courtney and Janet McTeer and The Man Who Invented Christmas, co-starring Dan Stevens. Plummer was nominated for a supporting actor Oscar for his role as J. Paul Getty in Ridley Scott’s “All the Money in the World.” He was the oldest actor to be nominated at age 88. He replaced Kevin Spacey after Spacey was accused of sexual misconduct, completely reshooting his scenes only one month before the film’s release in December of 2017. Plummer most recently appeared in Rian Johnson’s 2019 whodunit “Knives Out” and Peacock’s Canadian import series “Departure.”

He was married three times, the first to actress Tammy Grimes, the second to journalist Patricia Audrey Lewis. Plummer is survived by third wife, actress-dancer Taylor, and a daughter with Grimes, actress Amanda Plummer.

The Watcher (2000)

The Watcher is a 2000 American thriller film directed by Joe Charbanic and starring James Spader, Marisa Tomei, Ernie Hudson and Keanu Reeves. Set in Chicago, the film is about a retired FBI agent who quit as he was moments too late to save a young woman from a serial killer he has been investigating and who is stalked and taunted by the same serial killer.

RIP Mira Furlan

Mira Furlan, best known for her roles as Delenn on “Babylon 5” and Danielle Rousseau on “Lost,” died on Wednesday. She was 65. Her Twitter account announced the news on Thursday, and “Babylon 5” creator J. Michael Straczynski posted a tribute to the actress later that night. While a cause of death has yet not been revealed, Straczynski said the cast and crew of “Babylon 5” had “known for some time now that Mira’s health was fading.

Furlan was born in the former Yugoslavia, where she had a number of stage roles and was part of the Croatian National Theatre, and emigrated to the U.S. in 1991. She joined space opera “Babylon 5” as Delenn, the Minbari ambassador to the titular space station, in 1993, and would go on to star in the series for its full five seasons. In 2004, she made her debut in ABC’s megahit “Lost” as Danielle Rousseau, a scientist who’d been shipwrecked on the show’s mysterious island 16 years before the crash of the Oceanic Flight 815. She recurred throughout the series over its next few seasons.

Furlan continued to act through last year, and racked up dozens of credits across film and TV throughout her life. Her film credits include Emir Kusturica’s Oscar-nominated “When Father Was Away on Business,” “Beauty of Vice,” “Three For Happiness” and “In the Jaws of Life.” She is survived by Gaji? and their son, Marko Lav Gaji?.

RIP Julie Strain

Julie Strain who was an American actress and model who was Penthouse Pet of the Month in June 1991 and later chosen as the magazine’s Pet of the Year in 1993, has died on January 10th.  Nearly one year after a false report, it was reported that she died from dementia; she was 58 years old.

in her nineteen years of acting she racked up over 130 credits, including an appearance in the Exorcist spoof Repossessed, Steven Seagal’s Out for Justice, the Jean-Claude Van Damme film Double Impact, Naked Gun 33 1/3: The Final Insult, Beverly Hills Cop III, and the horror films Witchcraft IV: The Virgin Heart, Psycho Cop Returns, The Devil’s Pet, Sorceress, Sorceress II: The Temptress, the Bare Wench franchise, How to Make a Monster, Thirteen Erotic Ghosts, and Blood Gnome, among others.

Her most well-known roles came in Heavy Metal 2000 and the Andy Sidaris films Fit to Kill, Day of the Warrior, and L.E.T.H.A.L. Ladies: Return to Savage Beach, as well as Christian Drew Sidaris’s Enemy Gold and The Dallas Connection. Her half-sister Lizzy Strain followed her into acting, and the sisters both appeared in the films Bleed, Delta Delta Die!, Birth Rite, Bloodsucking Strippers, No Pain No Gain, Tales from the Crapper, Evil Ever After, Azira: Blood from the Sand, Chantal, The Devil’s Muse, and Magus.

It was revealed in 2018 that Strain was suffering from degenerative dementia, an affliction that was tied to head trauma she received from a horse riding accident when she was in her twenties. That accident also gave her retrograde amnesia, which wiped much of her youth from her memories.

Strain was married to Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles co-creator Kevin Eastman for over a decade, and together they had a son named Shane. Her longtime companion Dave had been taking care of her during her final years, and he was holding her hand when she passed away early Sunday morning.