Getting Your Band Out There

Playing in a band brings with it many great experiences. If you are just playing together in a basement every now and then, that is a great thing to do in itself, and there is no particular reason that you will need to make it any more than that. But sometimes it gets to a point where you do really feel that you should take it further, and when that happens it is an instinct which you might want to listen to. Even if you don’t become famous as such, you can hope to gain some popularity by focusing on a few key things, and that is absolutely worth doing. In this article, we are going to take a look at some of the best ways in which you can hope to get your band out there in the world.

Perform, Perform, Perform

The most important thing you can possibly do as a band that wants to get out there is perform! The more that you perform, the more that people will actually hear your music, which is what it’s all about. If you are putting more effort into marketing your band than actually playing, you are doing something wrong. You want to be playing at a different venue every week ideally, as that is how you will actually be able to let people know about your music in the real world. Of course, those venues can be absolutely anything, and they don’t have to be hugely significant or anything. Starting out at open mic nights is a great way to go, and there is a proud tradition of that, so that is something to consider. You might also think about trying out small local venues and building your way up. However you do it, as long as you are performing regularly, you are doing the most important thing you can to make your band known.

Get A Manager

If you want to be able to just focus on the music without having to worry about the business side of things, then you might want to think about getting a manager. With a manager on board, you can just offload all of that on to them, and you can set about just playing and performing and writing music without having to think about it. You might have a vision in mind, which you should express to your manager, but as long as you are just letting them get on with it, that should pretty much be all you need to do. You might feel that your band is too small for a manager, but that is almost certainly not the case. If you are worried about paying them, then remember that most will work solely on commission – which is why the partnership will tend to work so well, as they will have a very good reason to get your band out there as best as they can. Find a manager, and it could just be the best thing you have ever done for your band’s future.

Network

Part of the reason that you want to perform at as many events as you can is that you will meet a lot of people this way. Other bands and musicians, managers and agents, the owners and managers of venues and so on – all of these are useful people to come into contact with. You never know when speaking to someone might have a positive desired effect much further down the line, so this is why networking is always a hugely valuable thing for you to do. The more that you spend time in the world that you want to be a part of, the more that you will be a part of it. It really is that simple, and eventually it will translate into people actually knowing your name and what you do, so it is hugely valuable for that. Get networking in whatever way you can, and you will find that it starts to add up and make a considerable difference to your future.

Share Some Music Free

There is much to be said for the act of sharing out some music for free as a means of providing a taster for people. In a way, that is what you are doing when you perform, but there are plenty of other ways to do it too. You don’t need to go out to a venue to perform, for a start. You could play from your home, your studio, your basement or wherever, and simply use a live streaming service to allow people to watch it online. If you advertise it well in advance, this could be a really useful way of getting more people on board to come and listen to your music. You can also share out some files online of your music which people can share around. This is a great way to curry favour with music fans while also getting your music out there much more quickly, so it’s definitely worth it for that reason.

Get Marketing

You should at some point think about doing all the business stuff that really works – if you don’t already have a manager doing it for you. You need to think of your band as a business in some respects, which means knowing how to market yourselves. These days, that means getting on social media and building a following, which you can do fairly easily as long as you post regularly, interact with people lots, and link out to your own website occasionally. You will find that over time this helps to raise your profile, and it is something that all bands have to do these days, so it’s definitely worth thinking about. Marketing in this way can be incredibly powerful.

By taking advantage of these things, you should find that you are able to get your band out there much more effectively, so that is something that you should really think about. If you can do all this in one go, you will make it even more likely that your band gets well-known. Who knows: maybe one day soon, it will even be a household name.

Choosing Music For A Short Film Project

A film would not be complete without the incorporation of production music. Music is crucial in setting the tone, dramatising certain points, and evoking different emotions from those who are watching. Therefore, picking the right production music is pivotal and should be given a lot of attention to. After all, if a song or tune seems misplaced, then it can seriously deter from the successfulness of the film. There are lots of aspects you need to consider when it comes to picking the best music and this article will reveal exactly what those are.

What is your budget for your film’s production music?

Most short films do not have massive budgets. Either way, you need to make sure you define a budget from the outset. There are lots of different methods of acquiring production music – you could choose someone in an audio school program so the can low interest unsecured loan get experience.

Is the music relevant to the action on screen?

This sounds like an obvious point. However, sometimes some people are so desperate to incorporate a certain track that they ignore how relevant it is. You need to ensure the mood of the song is parallel to the mood of the characters on the screen. The other way of picking a song is if the short film you are producing is showing a character listening to some music. In this instance you need to get in the mind of your character and ask yourself what he or she would listen to on this occasion.

Remember viewers are only going to hear the song once

More often than not people’s favourite songs have grown on them. They listen to the tune in question over and over again and end up falling in love with it. You don’t have this luxury when it comes to putting together a short film. You need to find music that creates the right impression upon first hearing. Thus, when you are picking a track you need to determine your feelings on it the very first time you listen to it. Don’t listen to the tune 20 times and then decide that yes you like it.

Try to find original production music

There is nothing wrong with taking influence from other films. However, an issue can arise when a particular song is played in several films and thus automatically gets ingrained in your mind. Because of this, any other song you come across feels somewhat not good enough. It’s a bit like when you go shopping and you have a set picture in your mind regarding what clothes you want and thus nothing matches up to your ideal. When it comes to production music, you obviously have the option to use the popular tune in question. After all, if it has been used several times then it must be a great track. However, it is always better to try and be original. People are going to be much more impressed if you have the capacity to wow them with a song they have never heard before rather than play something that is popular at present.

If you consider the four points mentioned in this article whenever you are considering a certain track then you should have no trouble finding the perfect production music for your short film. Remember that the most important thing to do is define a budget from the outset so that you are looking for your music in the right places. This will make the process a lot quicker and easier. When considering different tracks try and look for something that is original, make sure that it is relevant to the action on screen, and think about the influence of the song upon first hearing only.

Malayalam Reality Song Contests

I’ve never been much for Malayalam music & songs for the most part. Throughout my years I’ve liked and loved quite a few songs but I am a rock guy and from my childhood the songs that have installment loans poor credit stayed with me are mostly not Indian/Malayalam.

While I am not that big on the talent based reality shows that are made around the world I do find the odd one or two that I really like. The Malayalam ones – here’s the problem: It’s like a singing school. There’s not much room or actually none really for improvisation, for singing your own version, making the song your own. If you change even a note while singing, the judges then decend upon you and it become a “class” led by a teacher. They want it note for note and will not adjust for changes. That’s not what music is about for me.

Music is about creativity and emotion. It’s about individuality and the best singers & musicians can take a great song and put their stamp on it, make it their own but yet pay respects to the original singers & musicians. That is usually what draws people to songs or atleast me and others who like the music that I like. There seems to be no room for that here in these contests and therefore, I have no time for them.

RIP Chris Squire

Chris Squire, the co-founder and longtime bassist of prog rock icons Yes and the only member of the group to feature on every studio album, has passed away just over a month after revealing that he was suffering from a rare form of leukemia. Squire was 67. Current Yes keyboardist Geoff Downes first tweeted the news, “Utterly devastated beyond words to have to report the sad news of the passing of my dear friend, bandmate and inspiration Chris Squire.”

Yes formed in 1968 after singer Jon Anderson met self-taught bassist Squire at a London music-industry bar; the pair were soon joined by guitarist Peter Banks, keyboardist Tony Kaye, and drummer Bill Bruford. Yes released their self-titled debut in 1969. However, it wasn’t until Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman replaced Banks and Kaye, respectively, that the prog rock group really hit it big with 1971’s The Yes Album and Fragile. Over the ensuing decades, Yes would see a parade of band members depart, enter and reenter, but Squire was the lone constant in the shape-shifting band, serving as their bassist for nearly 50 years. Squire is also credited as a co-writer on many of Yes’ greatest cuts, including “I’ve Seen All Good People,” “Starship Trooper,” “Owner of a Lonely Heart,” “Yours Is No Disgrace” and “Heart of the Sunrise.”

In addition to his work with Yes, Squire was involved in other side and solo projects. His 1975 solo LP Fish Out of Water is revered among prog fans. Squire also teamed with Yes part-time guitarist Billy Sherwood for their Conspiracy project in 2000 and, more recently, formed Squackett with Genesis guitarist Steve Hackett. Yes’ current incarnation featured singer Jon Davison, and as Squire told Rolling Stone, the vocalist was hired based on a recommendation from Foo Fighters’ Taylor Hawkins. In May, Squire revealed that he was recently diagnosed with acute erythroid leukemia, which would force him to miss the band’s summer co-headlining tour with Toto. The absence marked the first time in the band’s history that Yes performed without their longtime bassist.

Squire’s children are Carmen, Chandrika, Camille, Cameron and Xilan. Squire met his first wife Nikki in 1970 at a club in London. They married in 1972. She sang on the 1981 Christmas single “Run with the Fox” and also the track “Hold Out Your Hand” from Fish Out of Water (1975). In 1983, she formed Esquire, on whose first album Chris, Alan White and Trevor Horn assisted. Their family included Carmen, Chandrika and Camille Squire. The couple divorced after fifteen years of marriage. Squire married actress Melissa Morgan on 8 May 1993. She played Brittany Norman on The Young and the Restless and later returned to the daytime programme as Agnes Sorensen. The pair divorced in 2004. His third and final marriage was to Scotland Squire, who gave birth to daughter Xilan in 2008. They resided in the Chelsea neighbourhood of London, and latterly in Phoenix, Arizona.

What Can Music Teach Us About Getting Old?

“I hope I die before I get old” belted Roger Daltrey on the seminal track “My Generation,” and yes, while he may be a little bit on the grouchy side these days due to Brexit, that one sentiment perfectly encapsulates youth. But now, we see Roger Daltrey singing arguably The Who’s most famous song and wonder if he really meant it. It seems that now, getting older is it a passe thing, and that there are more musicians out there now in their late 30s, 40s, 50s and beyond, still pushing those youthful sentiments. But now, they’ve got the benefit of hindsight. While there are so many songs about the exuberance of youth, are there any songs we can use as a lesson on getting older?

Perfectly encapsulating the idea of maturity, the irony is not lost on Joni herself that recording it as a young lady; she was wise beyond her years. But most telling is that she revisited this song much later in her career, and while the sentiment of the song is that there are few truths learnt by living, as a more mature woman herself, having lived life, the song still suggests that there is as much a mystery to life when you are at the tail end of it.

Help The Aged by Pulp

What sounds like a plea to understand older people, the lyric belies a grimmer message. The line “can’t away from yourself” is a message to all of us getting older; that, no matter how much we try to dye our hair, and fight the inevitable, we will still end up as the person we were meant to be.

Veronica by Elvis Costello

An examination of his own grandmother Molly’s fading memory; the song chronicles Veronica’s life from the vivid pictures of her early years all the way to her non-existent existence in a care home, mute and ready for the end. Currently, it was co-written by one Paul McCartney, who had his very own thoughts on getting old chronicled in a very famous song…

When I’m 64 by The Beatles

Paul McCartney was actually 16 when he wrote this. While the imagery is incredibly twee, and masquerades as a music hall ditty, the comic imagery of living in idyllic lifestyle after retirement could provide a very warming sentiment for all of us concerned about getting on in years, when the idea of which granny flat designs we really want or if the car’s got enough petrol in it doesn’t necessarily matter in the long run. Because, when we hit retirement age, we will celebrate our birthdays with a bottle of wine, and have a jolly old time (well, hopefully).

Old Man by Neil Young

This was all about wanting acceptance from the elders in society. His plea that he is “a lot like” they were shows how we get so judgmental as we get older, that we forget that we had so much fun when we were young. Tellingly, Neil young was 24 when he wrote this, and now while he has every right to be a grouchy curmudgeon who is well beyond retirement age, he’s still looking to push the boundaries. He may very well be an old man, but his sentiments aren’t.

Losing My Edge by LCD Soundsystem

A lot of these songs writing about the perspective of being old from the POV of a younger person. This is, for all intents and purposes, from the perspective of an “older” person. While LCD front man James murphy wasn’t a grouchy old man when he wrote this (he was on the wrong side of 30), from the perspective of every 20-year-old around him, he must have seemed ancient! This is all about the worry that he’s not being relevant in music. That he’s losing his edge to everyone in existence.

Old friends by Simon and Garfunkel

Arguably the most melancholic of the songs on the list. It’s the story of two old men sitting on a bench wondering how strange it is to be 70 years old. While Paul Simon, who wrote this, turned 70 in 2011, this song has naturally gathered more meaning, and no doubt, he’s realized how far from strange it really is!

30 Something by Jay-Z

From the perspective of any teen growing up idolizing Jay-Z, when you turn 20, you may very well just get put out to pasture. But, this ode to hitting your 30s can do more than make you realize that you’re anything but old, but in fact, getting a stock portfolio is one of the great benefits of supposed “old” age. If it’s good enough for Jay-Z, it’s good enough for us!

Glory Days by Bruce Springsteen

While on the surface, it’s a pretty amusing ode to that guy who still talks about his high school football career as the crowning achievement of his life. But the most telling aspect about it is the song jumps between this and Springsteen’s semi-autobiographical tropes about his father being laid off. The moral of the story? Your glory days aren’t over. In fact, your glory days may very well be ahead of you!

So what can music teach us about getting old? It seems that now, we’ve got so many people writing about getting old from a youthful perspective, when these musicians are all hitting the time where they are supposed to be put out to pasture, but have more than their fair share of energy. The exuberance of youth, especially through music highlights just how much we all think that, when we are 20, 30 may as well be 75. But as the music we grew up listening to gets older and matures, so do we. They say that the music you listen to during your teen years shapes your entire life. As music appears to be predominantly a youthful practice, the songs about getting old and looking back on our youth are few and far between. “It Was A Very Good Year” by Frank Sinatra may very well be the pinnacle story of revisiting memories of youth…

ROSHAN’S ELEVEN: Guns n’ Roses Songs

When I was a teenager, Guns n’Roses could do no wrong. They were the biggest and baddest rock band in the world and no one could do what they could do. From the time back in 1988 when 12 year old me saw the video for Paradise City on a chart program sent to my cousins from their friends in the UK, I was hooked.

Since then a lot has changed. By the time I was in my early 20s my favs had changed, GnR had stopped putting out new music and the band members left to do other things. Still, nothing like some good ole GnR music to get the adrenaline flowing and they have some of the most awesome tunes. Here is what I think are their top 11 songs based on my tastes.

  • Sweet Child O’ Mine
  • November Rain
  • Don’t Cry
  • Paradise City
  • Welcome To The Jungle
  • Estranged
  • Patience
  • Civil War
  • Better
  • Yesterdays
  • This I Love