RIP Ric Ocasek

Ric Ocasek, the idiosyncratic singer and guitarist for the Cars and hit-making album producer, died on Sunday in his New York City apartment. He was 75. At approximately 3 p.m. ET, police officers responded to a 911 call at Ocasek’s home at 140 E. 19th Street, the rep said. Officers discovered Ocasek unconscious and unresponsive. He was later pronounced dead at the scene, though no cause of death has been revealed. A rep for the New York City Office of Chief Medical Examiner did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

Beginning with the Cars self-titled debut in 1978, Ocasek established himself as a stoic frontman with a sense of humor and melodrama on songs like “My Best Friend’s Girl,” “You’re All I’ve Got Tonight,” and “Good Times Roll.” As a member of the Cars, Ocasek helped kickstart the new-wave movement by pinning his disaffected vocals against herky-jerky rhythm guitar, dense keyboards and dancefloor-ready beats, and as one of the group’s lead vocalists, alongside bassist Benjamin Orr, he sang the hits “Shake It Up” and “You Might Think.” With the exception of only a couple of songs, Ocasek wrote every tune the Cars recorded. After the band broke up in 1988, Ocasek recorded as a solo artist and worked as a producer, helping sculpt blockbuster hits like Weezer’s Blue Album and Green Album and cult favorites like Bad Brains’ Rock for Light.

Ocasek developed a reputation as a successful producer, and took this role for many up-and-coming bands of differing genres including Bad Brains’ Rock for Light and Guided by Voices’ Do the Collapse. His other production credits include Weezer’s Blue Album and Green Album (both multi-platinum), Suicide,[15] Romeo Void, Hole,[15] Bebe Buell,[16] No Doubt,[15] Nada Surf, Irish folk-punk band Black 47, Bad Religion, Johnny Bravo, D Generation, The Wannadies, Possum Dixon, Martin Rev, Jonathan Richman, and the 2006 album by The Pink Spiders titled Teenage Graffiti. He also produced a portion of the third Motion City Soundtrack album, Even If It Kills Me. In 2014, Ocasek produced Everything Will Be Alright in the End, the ninth studio album by Weezer and his third collaboration with the band, and For All My Sisters, the sixth album by The Cribs.

Ocasek was married three times. He married early in life, but divorced and was married to his second wife, Suzanne Ocasek, in 1971. Ocasek was still married to Suzanne when he met 18-year-old model Paulina Porizkova during filming of the music video for the Cars’ song “Drive” in 1984. Ocasek and Porizkova were married on August 23, 1989. The couple unsecured payday loan had two sons, Jonathan Raven Otcasek (b. November 4, 1993), and Oliver Otcasek (b. 1999). In May 2018, Porizkova announced she and Ocasek had separated a year earlier.

RIP Eddie Money

Eddie Money, the singer-saxophonist whose string of hits include “Baby Hold On,” “Two Tickets to Paradise” and “Take Me Home Tonight,” died Friday in Los Angeles at the age of 70. “The Money Family regrets to announce that Eddie passed away peacefully early this morning,” the family said in a statement to Rolling Stone. “It is with heavy hearts that we say goodbye to our loving husband and father. We cannot imagine our world without him. We are grateful that he will live on forever through his music.”

Money suffered a series of health problems in recent years, and in August revealed he was battling stage 4 esophageal cancer in a promo for the upcoming season of Real Money, a TV series about the rocker’s life. In July, Money canceled his summer tour after developing pneumonia while recovering from his recent heart valve surgery. “The heart issue was a condition unrelated to his cancer,” AXS TV noted. Despite the multiple health issues, Money still planned on returning to the road later this year.

The Brooklyn-born, Long Island-raised rocker born Eddie Mahoney broke into the music scene after moving to Berkeley, California in the late-Sixties; after nearly a decade honing his craft on the Bay Area rock scene with manager Bill Graham, Money inked a deal with Columbia Records, which distributed his self-titled album in 1977. Eddie Money went double-platinum and both “Two Tickets to Paradise” and “Baby Hold On,” Money’s first single, landed in the upper quarter of the Hot 100, beginning a decade-long stretch where the singer routinely deposited hits on the charts, despite being largely disregarded and derided by rock critics at the time.

In the early Eighties – following a 1981 incident that gave Money the distinction of being the first rocker to overdose on fentanyl – Money made a comeback with his platinum-selling 1982 album No Control and its Hot 100 hits “Shakin’” and “Think I’m in Love.” While the rocker continued pumping out radio gold like “Club Michelle” and “The Big Crash,” 1983’s Where’s the Party? marked the lowest-charting album of his career at that point. However, following another battle with addiction, Money scored the biggest hit of his career in 1986 with “Take Me Home Tonight,” a duet with Ronnie Spector.

Money continued to register hits throughout the late Eighties but slowed his output over the next decade, releasing only three albums including 1999’s Ready Eddie, his last LP of original music. Beloved by his fanbase, Money spent the next two decades as a workhorse-touring artist before health issues slowed him in recent years. The always-quotable Money was also the star of the AXS TV reality series Real Money, which focused on the rocker and his family life. Money married his wife Laurie in 1989. They had five children: Zachary, Jessica, Joseph, Julian, and Desmond. He “made his home” in the Bay Area and performed often in San Francisco’s clubs.

The Dirt

The Dirt is a 2019 American biographical drama film directed by Jeff Tremaine from a screenplay by Rich Wilkes, about glam metal band Mötley Crüe. The film stars Douglas Booth, Colson Baker, Daniel Webber, and Iwan Rheon. Talks of a Mötley Crüe biopic began as early as 2006, when Paramount Pictures and MTV Films purchased the rights to the book The Dirt: Confessions of the World’s Most Notorious Rock Band by the band and Neil Strauss.

The movie starts off with showing us Nikki Sixx’s bad family life with a mother who had several boyfriends, who were abusive, after his father left them. He left his Seattle home and ends up in Los Angeles in 1978. After a failed attempt to connect with his biological father, Frank legally changes his name to “Nikki Sixx” in 1980. A year later, after a falling out with members of London at the Whisky a Go Go, Nikki befriends drummer Tommy Lee and reveals to him that he is forming a new band. Joining the band is guitarist Mick Mars, who suffers from ankylosing spondylitis. The trio then recruit lead vocalist Vince Neil from the cover band Rockandi, and after some brainstorming, the quartet name themselves Mötley Crüe.

After a quick brawl with some audience members during the start of their first performance, the band start to gain a solid reputation in the Los Angeles rock community and gain a large fan following. They sell out all over LA and have outrageous parties afterwards. Rookie producer Tom Zutaut of Elektra Records approaches them with a five-album deal and they sign Doc McGhee as their manager. Their first major tour is supporting Ozzy Osbourne, played by Tony Cavalero, who advised them on limits of partying – and then goes on to snort ants and lick urine. The movie showcases some of the partying excess, success & notoriety that the band would go on to earn during the heady days of the 80s. Tommy, after dumping his ex-gf who was disapproved off by his mom, would meet Heather Locklear and get married, while Vince marries mud wrestler Sharise Ruddell and they have a daughter named Skylar.

At a party, Vince and Hanoi Rocks drummer Razzle drive out to buy more drinks and get into a car accident that kills Razzle and has Vince sentenced to 30 days in jail for vehicular manslaughter, which is subsequently reduced to 19 days. Nikki becomes addicted to heroin and starts to display destructive behavior towards his bandmates. He fires McGhee for bringing Deana to visit him. Nikki overdoses on heroin and is initially declared dead, but a paramedic who is a big fan of the band brings him back to life with two shots of adrenaline. Following this, Nikki has the band go to rehab. A sober Mötley Crüe rebounds in 1989 with Dr. Feelgood, which becomes their first number one album on the Billboard 200, followed by a lengthy world tour. The months of touring and staying sober take their toll on Vince and Tommy, who resort to drinking again after being away from their families for too long.

Following the tour, Vince discovers that Sharise and their daughter Skylar have left him, causing him to miss several rehearsals and eventually part ways with the band in 1992. The band then hires John Corabi as his replacement. In 1995, Skylar dies of stomach cancer at the age of four. Heather divorces Tommy after he is caught having an affair with a porn star. Seeing the backlash by fans over Vince’s departure from the band, Nikki negotiates with Zutaut to give them back the rights to their songs in exchange for their release from Elektra Records. After visiting his father’s grave, Nikki regroups with Tommy and Mick before they reconcile with Vince. Mötley Crüe would perform together for another 20 years, playing their final show on New Year’s Eve 2015 (however the band have since reformed).

Debauchery, rock music and partying aside, the movie is a bit tame for Motely. It’s more like a VH1 style movie, sans a couple of scenes, and fails to showcase the more controversial events of the band. They should have had more stuff from the 90s onwards and therefore seems like only half a story. I give it a 7 outta 10! It was fun.

How To Start A Music Blog

If you are ready to get invested in starting your own music blog, you’ve come to the right place. Setting yourself up for success in this venture is important if you want to get it right, and this takes time and energy and a creative plan of action to go from an idea to a real working blog. There are a lot of things that have changed in the blogging world over the years, and when it comes to music blogging, you need to ensure your plan is one that fits with the way that things are currently done. Currently, major music blogs promote their musicians on social media and encourage as much music sharing online as possible. There are so many new ways to source and listen to new music, and your blog could be successful in doing so.

Let’s take a look at how to start a successful music blog.


Research
The very first thing that you should do before you get started on your own music blog is to look at the successful ones that are out there right now. It doesn’t matter if they’re not to your personal music taste; their success means that they are someones! Your research will help you to understand what makes people keep coming back for more. It’s not about copying a site, but taking inspiration from it and getting a general idea of what you could do with your music blog.

Take notes about whether they are using background music from sites like https://stockmusic.net/royalty-free-music or whether they are quiet websites. Look to see if they are global or regional. Think about what their interactive features are and whether they are to your taste. There are plenty of options here to get those creative juices flowing, and the notes are taken to ensure your own success.

Defining Your Blog
You need to know what will make your blog unique if you hope to be successful. Think about whether you want to focus on the local artists to you or go for a global interest.

What Will You Blog About?
Are you blogging about popular music or independent new bands that need exposure? Are you discussing the music industry as a whole? Are you planning to showcase videos? You need to make some decisions on all of these and ensure that you will have the readership to make it a installment loans poor credit successful option for you. You want your blog to be a resource, giving them more than one reason to visit your blog than just hear about artists that you review. You must be as consistent as possible with your blog and keep it to what your readers want rather than what others are doing.

Once you’ve decided on those essential things, you then need to think about the creation of your blog. There are plenty of options out there for host platforms and blogging websites to carry your blog; the important bit is knowing what is going on the blog in the first place.

Getting Your Band Out There

Playing in a band brings with it many great experiences. If you are just playing together in a basement every now and then, that is a great thing to do in itself, and there is no particular reason that you will need to make it any more than that. But sometimes it gets to a point where you do really feel that you should take it further, and when that happens it is an instinct which you might want to listen to. Even if you don’t become famous as such, you can hope to gain some popularity by focusing on a few key things, and that is absolutely worth doing. In this article, we are going to take a look at some of the best ways in which you can hope to get your band out there in the world.

Perform, Perform, Perform

The most important thing you can possibly do as a band that wants to get out there is perform! The more that you perform, the more that people will actually hear your music, which is what it’s all about. If you are putting more effort into marketing your band than actually playing, you are doing something wrong. You want to be playing at a different venue every week ideally, as that is how you will actually be able to let people know about your music in the real world. Of course, those venues can be absolutely anything, and they don’t have to be hugely significant or anything. Starting out at open mic nights is a great way to go, and there is a proud tradition of that, so that is something to consider. You might also think about trying out small local venues and building your way up. However you do it, as long as you are performing regularly, you are doing the most important thing you can to make your band known.

Get A Manager

If you want to be able to just focus on the music without having to worry about the business side of things, then you might want to think about getting a manager. With a manager on board, you can just offload all of that on to them, and you can set about just playing and performing and writing music without having to think about it. You might have a vision in mind, which you should express to your manager, but as long as you are just letting them get on with it, that should pretty much be all you need to do. You might feel that your band is too small for a manager, but that is almost certainly not the case. If you are worried about paying them, then remember that most will work solely on commission – which is why the partnership will tend to work so well, as they will have a very good reason to get your band out there as best as they can. Find a manager, and it could just be the best thing you have ever done for your band’s future.

Network

Part of the reason that you want to perform at as many events as you can is that you will meet a lot of people this way. Other bands and musicians, managers and agents, the owners and managers of venues and so on – all of these are useful people to come into contact with. You never know when speaking to someone might have a positive desired effect much further down the line, so this is why networking is always a hugely valuable thing for you to do. The more that you spend time in the world that you want to be a part of, the more that you will be a part of it. It really is that simple, and eventually it will translate into people actually knowing your name and what you do, so it is hugely valuable for that. Get networking in whatever way you can, and you will find that it starts to add up and make a considerable difference to your future.

Share Some Music low interest unsecured loan Free

There is much to be said for the act of sharing out some music for free as a means of providing a taster for people. In a way, that is what you are doing when you perform, but there are plenty of other ways to do it too. You don’t need to go out to a venue to perform, for a start. You could play from your home, your studio, your basement or wherever, and simply use a live streaming service to allow people to watch it online. If you advertise it well in advance, this could be a really useful way of getting more people on board to come and listen to your music. You can also share out some files online of your music which people can share around. This is a great way to curry favour with music fans while also getting your music out there much more quickly, so it’s definitely worth it for that reason.

Get Marketing

You should at some point think about doing all the business stuff that really works – if you don’t already have a manager doing it for you. You need to think of your band as a business in some respects, which means knowing how to market yourselves. These days, that means getting on social media and building a following, which you can do fairly easily as long as you post regularly, interact with people lots, and link out to your own website occasionally. You will find that over time this helps to raise your profile, and it is something that all bands have to do these days, so it’s definitely worth thinking about. Marketing in this way can be incredibly powerful.

By taking advantage of these things, you should find that you are able to get your band out there much more effectively, so that is something that you should really think about. If you can do all this in one go, you will make it even more likely that your band gets well-known. Who knows: maybe one day soon, it will even be a household name.

Choosing Music For A Short Film Project

A film would not be complete without the incorporation of production music. Music is crucial in setting the tone, dramatising certain points, and evoking different emotions from those who are watching. Therefore, picking the right production music is pivotal and should be given a lot of attention to. After all, if a song or tune seems misplaced, then it can seriously deter from the successfulness of the film. There are lots of aspects you need to consider when it comes to picking the best music and this article will reveal exactly what those are.

What is your budget for your film’s production music?

Most short films do not have massive budgets. Either way, you need to make sure you define a budget from the outset. There are lots of different methods of acquiring production music – you could choose someone in an audio school program so the can get experience.

Is the music relevant to the action on screen?

This sounds like an obvious point. However, sometimes some people are so desperate to incorporate a certain track that they ignore how relevant it is. You need to ensure the mood of the song is parallel to the mood of the characters on the screen. The other way of picking a song is if the short film you are producing is showing a character listening to some music. In this instance you need to get in the mind of your character and ask yourself what he or she would listen to on this occasion.

Remember viewers are only going to hear the song once

More often than not people’s favourite songs have grown on them. They listen to the tune in question over and over again and end up falling in love with it. You don’t have this luxury when it comes to putting together a short film. You need to find music that creates the right impression upon first hearing. Thus, when you are picking a track you need to determine your feelings on it the very first time you listen to it. Don’t listen to the tune 20 times and then decide that yes you like it.

Try to find original production music

There is nothing wrong with taking influence from other films. However, an issue can arise when a particular song is played in several films and thus automatically gets ingrained in your mind. Because of this, any other song you come across feels somewhat not good enough. It’s a bit like when you go shopping and you have a set picture in your mind regarding what clothes you want and thus nothing matches up to your ideal. When it comes to production music, you obviously have the option to use the popular tune in question. After all, if it has been used several times then it must be a great track. However, it is always better to try and be original. People are going to be much more impressed if you have the capacity to wow them with a song they have never heard before rather than play something that is popular at present.

If you consider the four points mentioned in this article whenever you are considering a certain track then you should have no trouble finding the perfect production music for your short film. Remember that the most important thing to do is define a budget from the outset so that you are looking for your music in the right places. This will make the process a lot quicker and easier. When considering different tracks try and look for something that is original, make sure that it is relevant to the action on screen, and think about the influence of the song upon first hearing only.

Malayalam Reality Song Contests

I’ve never been much for Malayalam music & songs for the most part. Throughout my years I’ve liked and loved quite a few songs but I am a rock guy and from my childhood the songs that have stayed with me are mostly not Indian/Malayalam.

While I am not that big on the talent based reality shows that are made around the world I do find the odd one or two that I really like. The Malayalam ones – here’s the problem: It’s like a singing school. There’s not much room or actually none really for improvisation, for singing your own version, making the song your own. If you change even a note while singing, the judges then decend upon you and it become a “class” led by a teacher. They want it note for note and will not adjust for changes. That’s not what music is about for me.

Music is about creativity and emotion. It’s about individuality and the best singers & musicians can take a great song and put their stamp on it, make it their own but yet pay respects to the original singers & musicians. That is usually what draws people to songs or atleast me and others who like the music that I like. There seems to be no room for that here in these contests and therefore, I have no time for them.

RIP Chris Squire

Chris Squire, the co-founder and longtime bassist of prog rock icons Yes and the only member of the group to feature on every studio album, has passed away just over a month after revealing that he was suffering from a rare form of leukemia. Squire was 67. Current Yes keyboardist Geoff Downes first tweeted the news, “Utterly devastated beyond words to have to report the sad news of the passing of my dear friend, bandmate and inspiration Chris Squire.”

Yes formed in 1968 after singer Jon Anderson met self-taught bassist Squire at a London music-industry bar; the pair were soon joined by guitarist Peter Banks, keyboardist Tony Kaye, and drummer Bill Bruford. Yes released their self-titled debut in 1969. However, it wasn’t until Steve Howe and Rick Wakeman replaced Banks and Kaye, respectively, that the prog rock group really hit it big with 1971’s The Yes Album and Fragile. Over the ensuing decades, Yes would see a parade of band members depart, enter and reenter, but Squire was the lone constant in the shape-shifting band, serving as their bassist for nearly 50 years. Squire is also credited as a co-writer on many of Yes’ greatest cuts, including “I’ve Seen All Good People,” “Starship Trooper,” “Owner of a Lonely Heart,” “Yours Is No Disgrace” and “Heart of the Sunrise.”

In addition to his work with Yes, Squire was involved in other side and solo projects. His 1975 solo LP Fish Out of Water is revered among prog fans. Squire also teamed with Yes part-time guitarist Billy Sherwood for their Conspiracy project in 2000 and, more recently, formed Squackett with Genesis guitarist Steve Hackett. Yes’ current incarnation featured singer Jon Davison, and as Squire told Rolling Stone, the vocalist was hired based on a recommendation from Foo Fighters’ Taylor Hawkins. In May, Squire revealed that he was recently diagnosed with acute erythroid leukemia, which would force him to miss the band’s summer co-headlining tour with Toto. The absence marked the first time in the band’s history that Yes performed without their longtime bassist.

Squire’s children are Carmen, Chandrika, Camille, Cameron and Xilan. Squire met his first wife Nikki in 1970 at a club in London. They married in 1972. She sang on the 1981 Christmas single “Run with the Fox” and also the track “Hold Out Your Hand” from Fish Out of Water (1975). In 1983, she formed installment loans poor credit Esquire, on whose first album Chris, Alan White and Trevor Horn assisted. Their family included Carmen, Chandrika and Camille Squire. The couple divorced after fifteen years of marriage. Squire married actress Melissa Morgan on 8 May 1993. She played Brittany Norman on The Young and the Restless and later returned to the daytime programme as Agnes Sorensen. The pair divorced in 2004. His third and final marriage was to Scotland Squire, who gave birth to daughter Xilan in 2008. They resided in the Chelsea neighbourhood of London, and latterly in Phoenix, Arizona.