A Look Back At The 2014 World Cup In Brazil

With the 2014 World Cup returning to Brazil, the country had much to prove since it had suffered two consecutive quarterfinal exits in the preceding competitions. The 2014 World Cup did not disappoint. During the tournament, players found the back of the net a whopping 171 times, matching the 1998 record in France. Many would argue that the 2014 World Cup was the best one since the 1982 iteration. The tournament was chock-full of controversy, drama, brilliance, and heartbreak. The first week of the 2014 World Cup brought about the biggest upset. Spain’s unexpected demolition was the talk of football nerds for years to come. Spain entered the competition after bagging the Euro in 2008 and 2012, with the 2010 World Cup between them. A double defeat by the Netherlands and Chile, took Spain out in the first round.

Fans were left with their jaws on the floor when Suarez bit Chiellini in their final group stage match. Uruguay won 1-0, but Suarez’s (not so) unexpected bite overshadowed the game’s outcome. Costa Rica stunned everyone when they beat Uruguay 3-1 in their opening match. Brazil’s chance to wipe out the Maracanazo memories from 1950, where they lost in the final, came in the 2014 World Cup. They had spent years building themselves for the 2014 tournament. Unbelievably, they were routed by Germany in a 7-1 defeat. Germany scored four of the goals within six minutes. The tale of national redemption for Brazil turned into one of humiliation in the 2014 World Cup. The drama surrounding Germany’s win over Brazil almost overshadowed Miloslav Klose’s fete of beating Ronaldo’s 15 World Cup goals.

More than one billion fans tuned in to watch the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil final. In addition, the competition reached a global in-home television audience of 3.2 billion people, according to final figures from FIFA and Kantar Media. An estimated 280 million people worldwide watched matches online or on a mobile device, which shows that more and more fans are embracing new technology for sports content. The 2014 FIFA World Cup broke several TV audience records in key international markets, including the United States and Germany. Six hundred ninety-five million people watched the final between Argentina and Germany, up 12 percent from the 2010 final. Over 1.013 billion people watched the final, including those who watched for more than a minute at home and away from home.