Ever Tried Drafting A Post While Traveling? How Did It Work Out For You?

Yes quite a few times and I mostly publish them as well when I am away. Look, back in 2010 – I think – when I bought my first BlackBerry, one of the apps that I downloaded was the WordPress app for BlackBerry. This was ofcourse to capture my thoughts and view points as I was out and about and enjoying the city. Or if I traveled like to Bangalore for 3 days. So I would type up whole blog posts on the app and post them.

Later on I would take my laptop with me and connecting via wifi I would posts from coffeeshops or restaurants and in 2015 and 2016 when I traveled to Chennai and Delhi/Gurgaon respectively, I relied on the wifi to blog from either my phone or my laptop. My stay in Chennai was only 6 days and it as around 2 weeks for Delhi and I think I blogged almost ever day I was there.

Also when I went on holiday – well more like staycation in a hotel – in both 2019 & 2020 and stayed in a hotel I blogged regularly from there. In 2019 at the hotel I stayed, unfortunately due to a problem with my laptop I could connect the laptop to the wifi so my phone acted as a modem. That was for 3 days. Then the next year I stayed for 4 days in a hotel and I was using my current laptop and was blogging a couple of times per day.

Prompt from 87 Blog Post Ideas That Will Never Fail You (2023) at Blog Tyrant

Some Health Benefits Of Broccoli

Broccoli (Brassica oleracea) is a cruciferous vegetable related to cabbage, kale, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts. Broccoli is high in many nutrients, including fiber, vitamin C, vitamin K, iron, and potassium. It also boasts more protein than most other vegetables. This green veggie can be enjoyed both raw and cooked, but recent research shows that gentle steaming provides the most health benefits.

Health benefits of broccoli : Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli provide sulfur-containing compounds that are responsible for their often pungent taste. These bioactive compounds may have numerous health benefits.

Cancer prevention : Cancer is characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal cells and is often linked to oxidative stress (22Trusted Source). Broccoli is loaded with compounds that are believed to protect against cancer. Observational studies suggest that the consumption of cruciferous vegetables, including broccoli, is linked to a reduced risk of many cancers, including lung, colorectal, breast, prostate, pancreatic, and gastric cancers. A unique family of plant compounds called isothiocyanates sets cruciferous vegetables apart from other veggies.

Studies suggest that Isothiocyanates affect liver enzymes, reduce oxidative stress, decrease inflammation, stimulate your immune system, and combat the development and growth of cancer. The main isothiocyanate in broccoli, sulforaphane, acts against the formation of cancer at the molecular level by reducing oxidative stress. Sulforaphane¬†occurs at 20‚Äď100 times higher amounts in young broccoli sprouts than in full-grown heads of this vegetable. Though broccoli supplements are also available, they may not contribute an equivalent amount of isothiocyanates and thus may not give the same health benefits as eating whole, fresh broccoli (33Trusted Source,¬†34Trusted Source).

Lower cholesterol levels : Cholesterol has many important functions in your body. For example, it is a key factor in the formation of bile acids, which help you digest fat. Bile acids are formed in your liver, stored in your gallbladder, and released into your digestive system whenever you eat fat. Afterward, the bile acids are reabsorbed into your bloodstream and used again. Substances in broccoli bind with bile acids in your gut, increasing their excretion and preventing them from being reused. This results in the synthesis of new bile acids from cholesterol, reducing total levels of this marker in your body. This effect has been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease and cancer. According to one study, steamed broccoli is particularly useful for lowering cholesterol levels.

Eye health : Impaired eyesight is a common consequence of aging. Two of the main carotenoids in broccoli, lutein and zeaxanthin, are associated with a decreased risk of age-related eye disorders. Vitamin A deficiency may cause night blindness, which can be reversed with improved vitamin A status. Broccoli contains beta carotene, which your body converts into vitamin A. This vegetable may thus boost eyesight in individuals with a low vitamin A intake.