Marc-Andre Fleury & The Mask Debate With The NHL

Veteran goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury took a stand against NHL regulations by wearing a custom-designed mask for the Minnesota Wild’s Native American Heritage night on Friday. Despite being informed by the league that such a display was not allowed, Fleury hit the ice against the Colorado Avalanche proudly donning the specially crafted mask. Agent Allan Walsh confirmed earlier reports that the NHL had prohibited Fleury from wearing the mask, even during warmups. The league has a strict policy against players showcasing specialty jerseys, masks, stickers, decals, or tape for theme nights. This stance has drawn criticism in the past, notably during Pride nights when the NHL initially banned rainbow-colored tape, only to backtrack following backlash from the hockey community.

For Marc-Andre Fleury, the motivation behind his defiance was personal and poignant. Wanting to honor his wife, V√©ronique, an Indigenous woman, Fleury aimed to celebrate Native American Heritage Night in a meaningful way. The 38-year-old goaltender from Montreal, Quebec ‚Äď a three-time Stanley Cup champion and the 2021 Vezina Trophy winner for the league’s top goaltender ‚Äď made a powerful statement about recognizing and respecting diverse backgrounds within the hockey community. Marc-Andre Fleury’s actions have reignited discussions about the¬†NHL’s uniform policy and the balance between honoring cultural heritage and adhering to league regulations. His decision to prioritize personal expression and support for his wife adds a compelling chapter to the ongoing conversation about inclusivity in the sport.

Despite the NHL’s strict regulations against players donning specialty items for theme nights, it appears that goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury and the¬†Minnesota Wild¬†may avoid fines for the custom-designed mask worn during Native American Heritage night. Fleury, seeking to honor his wife, Veronique, who is of Abenaki and Mi’kmaq descent, offered to pay any potential fine personally. In response, the NHL reportedly threatened the organization with an “additional significant fine.”

What To Do Before Boarding Your Dog At A Pet Hotel

What to do before boarding your dog at a Pet Hotel

If your pet is healthy and gets along well with other pets, then boarding them at a pet hotel or a kennel might be a good option. How much comfort, pampering and personal attention your pet is likely to receive depends on how much you’re willing to spend. Before you do¬† so, here are a few things you should do before you sign up with them:

  • Make sure your pet’s vaccinated.¬†In addition to rabies, distemper and canine parvovirus vaccinations, your dog may also be required to receive a Bordetella vaccine prior to their kennel stay. Many pet boarding facilities require a health certificate from your veterinarian as proof that they’ve had all their shots and are in good health.

  • Rid them of fleas, ticks and other parasites.¬†If your pet is on a regular prevention protocol, this may be included on their health certificate.

  • Prepare enough of their regular food to eat during their stay.¬†Because switching foods quickly can cause both dogs and cats to experience upset tummies, many pet hotels and kennels require that you provide food from home.

  • Prepare their medication, along with instructions.¬†If your pet takes regular medication, provide enough to get them through their stay. Also, write out detailed instructions for the boarder and share your vet’s contact information.

  • Let them bring something from home.¬†While it might be tempting to let your pet bring their favourite toy, it’s better to bring something that they won’t miss if it gets destroyed or left behind. An old T-shirt or blanket that has your scent on it will help give them comfort and reassurance.

  • Take them to visit the facility before your trip. If possible, bring your pup or kitty to the facility a few days before your holiday starts, and let them become familiar with the space and the people who work there. This will help your pet feel more comfortable when you leave them there for an extended stay.