RIP Louise Fletcher

Louise Fletcher, the imposing, steely-eyed actress who won an Academy Award, a¬†BAFTA Award, and a¬†Golden Globe Award for her role as the tyrannical Nurse Ratched in One Flew Over the Cuckoo‚Äôs Nest, died on Friday at her home in the town of Montdurausse, in Southern France. She was 88. The death was confirmed by her agent, David Shaul, who did not cite a cause. Ms. Fletcher also had a home in Los Angeles. ¬†She was also well-known for her recurring role as the Bajoran religious leader¬†Kai Winn Adami¬†in the television series¬†Star Trek: Deep Space Nine¬†(1993‚Äď99), as well as for her role as Helen Rosemond in the movie¬†Cruel Intentions¬†(1999).

Born in Alabama to two deaf parents, she was initially taught by her aunt. She was nominated for two Emmy Awards for her roles in the television series Picket Fences (1996) and Joan of Arcadia (2004). Her final role was as Rosie in the Netflix series Girlboss (2017). Fletcher began appearing in several television series including¬†Lawman¬†(1958) and¬†Maverick (1959) before her two guest roles in Perry Mason in 1960. She was a relatively unknown 40 year old when she was cast as Nurse Ratched in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975).

Since then he made several financially and critically successful films, while others were box-office failures. Her roles in more successful films such as Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977), The Lady in Red (1979), Firestarter (1984), Invaders From Mars (1986), Flowers in the Attic (1987), Two Moon Junction (1988), Virtuosity (1995) and Cruel Intentions (1999, as Sebastian’s aunt). Additionally, she played the character Ruth Shorter, a supporting role, in¬†Aurora Borealis¬†(2005), alongside¬†Joshua Jackson¬†and¬†Donald Sutherland, and appeared in the¬†Fox Faith¬†film¬†The Last Sin Eater (2007). She also was in tv movies but her most famous role on tv was as the recurring role in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine as the scheming Bajoran religious leader Kai Winn Adami.

Let me tell you something РI will always associate her as Adami (I have also watched her in Flowers In The Attic & Exorcist II: The Heretic. And I, like most people hate the character. That is a credit to her acting; she really played that role so well. Similarly in Flowers In The Attic she plays another character that I despise but man what a talented actress. I feel a profound sadness on the loss.

Seven Facts About Nichelle Nichols

1. She was the first African‚ÄďAmerican actress to play a mainstay role on US television and paved the way for other African-American actors in the industry.

2. Nichelle influenced many intergalactic movies with her unique 60s fashion style of skirts and thigh-high boots.

3. Uhura and Captain Kirk shared a kiss on screen that was one of the first interracial kisses to be shown on US television.

4. Nichelle had partnered with NASA to recruit women and those belonging to minorities for their space programme.

5. Nichelle initially had left the cult show for a Broadway play but Martin Luther Jr. was the driving force that made her return to the show. According to Martin, the show portrayed a non-stereotypical character that inspired many that had never been seen on US television before. Nichelle got inspired by his words and decided to keep portraying the character.

6. Her character Uhura became a role model for minority astronauts Sally Ride and Colonel Guion Bluford who were a part of Nichelle‚Äôs space programme.

7. The late actress had a soulful voice and a musical resume. In one of the Star Trek episodes, Uhura partners with Spock to treat her crew members to a melodious song.

Nichelle Nichols The First Lady Of Science Fiction Has Passed Away

Actress and singer Nichelle Nichols, best known for her groundbreaking portrayal of Lt. Nyota Uhura in “Star Trek: The Original Series,” has died at age 89, according to a statement from her son, Kyle Johnson. Nichols died from natural causes, he said. Nichols portrayed communications officer Lt. Nyota Uhura in the “Star Trek” TV series and many of its film offshoots. When “Star Trek” began in 1966, Nichols was a television rarity: a Black woman in a notable role on a prime-time television series. There had been African-American women on TV before, but they often played domestic workers and had small roles; Nichols’ Uhura was an integral part of the multicultural “Star Trek” crew.

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. called it “the first non-stereotypical role portrayed by a Black woman in television history.” Nichols is widely known for participating in one of the first interracial kisses on US television when her character kissed James T. Kirk, portrayed by White Canadian actor William Shatner. In an interview with CNN in 2014, Nichols said the kiss scene “changed television forever, and it also changed the way people looked at one another.” After “Trek’s” three-season run, Nichols dedicated herself to the space program. She helped NASA in making the agency more diverse, helping to recruit astronauts Sally Ride, Judith Resnik and Guion Bluford, among others.

George Takei, who portrayed the USS Enterprise’s helmsman Hikaru Sulu, posted a touching tribute to his co-star. “I shall have more to say about the trailblazing, incomparable Nichelle Nichols, who shared the bridge with us as Lt. Uhura of the USS Enterprise, and who passed today at age 89,” wrote Takei on Twitter. “For today, my heart is heavy, my eyes shining like the stars you now rest among, my dearest friend.” NASA tweeted “We celebrate the life of Nichelle Nichols, Star Trek actor, trailblazer, and role model, who symbolized to so many what was possible. She partnered with us to recruit some of the first women and minority astronauts, and inspired generations to reach for the stars.”

Nichols was born Grace Dell Nichols near Chicago in 1932. (Unhappy with Grace, she took the name Nichelle when she was a teenager.) Her grandfather was a White Southerner who married a Black woman, causing a rift in his family. Blessed with a four-octave vocal range, Nichols was performing in local clubs by the time she was 14. Among the performers she met was Duke Ellington, who later took her on tour. She also worked extensively in Chicago clubs and in theater. She moved to Los Angeles in the early ’60s and landed a role in a Gene Roddenberry series, “The Lieutenant.” A number of “Star Trek” veterans, including Leonard Nimoy, Walter Koenig and Majel Barrett, also worked on the show. When Roddenberry was creating “Trek,” he remembered Nichols. She was in Europe when she got the call.

Nichols was once tempted to leave the series; however, a conversation with¬†Martin Luther King Jr.¬†changed her mind. Towards the end of the first season, Nichols was given the opportunity to take a role on¬†Broadway. She preferred the stage to the television studio, so she decided to take the role. Nichols went to Roddenberry’s office, told him that she planned to leave, and handed him her resignation letter. Roddenberry tried to convince Nichols to stay but to no avail, so he told her to take the weekend off and if she still felt that she should leave then he would give her his blessing. But it took Dr. Martin King Jr to convince her to stay on the show. King personally encouraged her to stay on the series, saying she “could not give up” because she was playing a vital role model for Black children and young women across the country, as well as for other children who would see Black people appearing as equals, going so far as to favorably compare her work on the series to the marches of the ongoing¬†civil rights movement.

Former¬†NASA¬†astronaut¬†Mae Jemison¬†has cited Nichols’ role of Lieutenant Uhura as her inspiration for wanting to become an astronaut and¬†Whoopi Goldberg has also spoken of Nichols’ influence. In her role as Lieutenant¬†Uhura, Nichols kissed¬†white¬†actor¬†William Shatner¬†as Captain¬†James T. Kirk¬†in the November 22, 1968,¬†Star Trek¬†episode “Plato’s Stepchildren”. The episode is cited as the first example of an interracial kiss on scripted U.S. television. The Shatner/Nichols kiss was seen as groundbreaking, even though it was portrayed as having been forced by¬†alien¬†telekinesis. There was some praise and almost no dissent. Despite the cancellation of the series in 1969,¬†Star Trek¬†lived on in other ways, and continued to play a part in Nichols’ life. She again provided the voice of Uhura in¬†Star Trek: The Animated Series.

Nichols co-starred in six¬†Star Trek¬†films, the last one being¬†Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country. Between the end of the original series and the¬†Star Trek¬†animated series and feature films, Nichols appeared in small television and film roles. She briefly appeared as a secretary in¬†Doctor, You’ve Got to Be Kidding!¬†(1967), and portrayed Dorienda, a foul-mouthed madam in¬†Truck Turner¬†(1974) opposite¬†Isaac Hayes. In the comedy film¬†Snow Dogs¬†(2002), Nichols appeared as the mother of the male lead, played by¬†Cuba Gooding Jr. n 2006, she appeared as the title character in the film¬†Lady Magdalene’s, the madam of a legal¬†Nevada¬†brothel in tax default. Nichols released two music albums.¬†Down to Earth¬†is a collection of standards released in 1967, during the original run of¬†Star Trek. Out of This World, released in 1991, is more rock oriented and is themed around¬†Star Trek and space exploration.

In her autobiography, Nichols wrote that she was romantically involved with¬†Star Trek¬†creator¬†Gene Roddenberry¬†for a few years in the 1960s. She said the affair ended well before¬†Star Trek¬†began, when she realized Roddenberry was also involved with her acquaintance Majel Hudec (known as¬†Majel Barrett). Nichols married twice, first to dancer Foster Johnson (1917‚Äď1981). They were married in 1951 and divorced that same year. Johnson and Nichols had one child together,¬†Kyle Johnson, who was born August 14, 1951. She married for the second time to Duke Mondy in 1968. They were divorced in 1972. In early 2018, Nichols was diagnosed with¬†dementia, and subsequently announced her retirement from convention appearances. Asteroid¬†68410 Nichols is named in her honor. Nichols died of heart failure in¬†Silver City, New Mexico, on July 30, 2022, at the age of 89.

Ranking The Star Trek Tv Shows

Star Trek is going though a second golden age on television. In that we currently have 5 Trek shows that are running and active on streaming services. Out of those 5, 3 are live action and 2 are animated and one, Picard, is gonna end next year with it’s 3rd and final season that was planned well in advance. Despite Strange New Worlds having just completed their first season and Prodigy having only had 10 of their 20 episodes of the first season aired as of this date, I thought it would be a good time to rate the shows. So here is my list:

  • Star Trek : The Next Generation
  • Star Trek : Deep Space Nine
  • Star Trek : The Original Series
  • Star Trek : Enterprise
  • Star Trek : Voyager
  • Star Trek : Strange New Worlds
  • Star Trek : Lower Decks
  • Star Trek : Picard
  • Star Trek : Prodigy
  • Star Trek : Discovery

RIP Sally Kellerman

Sally Kellerman, the Oscar and Emmy nominated actor who played Margaret ‚ÄúHot Lips‚ÄĚ Houlihan in director Robert Altman’s 1970 film ‚ÄúMASH,” died yesterday. Kellerman died of heart failure at her home in the Woodland Hills section of Los Angeles, her manager and publicist Alan Eichler said. She was 84. Kellerman had a career of more than 60 years in film and television. She played a college professor who was returning student Rodney Dangerfield’s love interest in the 1986 comedy ‚ÄúBack to School.‚ÄĚ And she was a regular in Altman’s films, appearing in 1970’s ‚ÄúBrewster McCloud,” 1992’s ‚ÄúThe Player‚ÄĚ and 1994’s ‚ÄúReady to Wear.‚ÄĚ But she would always be best known for playing Major Houlihan, a straitlaced, by-the-book Army nurse who is tormented by rowdy doctors during the Korean War in the army comedy ‚ÄúMASH.”

Born in Long Beach, California, on June 2, 1937 she made a number of television-series appearances in the 60s. She was in an episode of the western Cheyenne¬†as well as a role as a waitress in the¬†John Forsythe¬†sitcom¬†Bachelor Father. Struggling for parts in television and films, Kellerman acted on stage. She debuted in¬†Henrik Ibsen’s¬†An Enemy of the People,?¬†followed by parts in a¬†Pasadena Playhouse¬†production of¬†Leslie Stevens’s¬†The Marriage-Go-Round¬†and¬†Michael Shurtleff’s¬†Call Me by My Rightful Name (1962). A big claim to fame is that she played psychiatrist Elizabeth Dehner (who studied the long-term effects of space on a crew) in “Where No Man Has Gone Before“, the second pilot for¬†Star Trek. Three months after that, Kellerman played Mag Wildwood in the original Broadway production of¬†Breakfast at Tiffany’s.

Kellerman received her breakthrough role as Major Margaret “Hot Lips” Houlihan in Robert Altman’s¬†M*A*S*H in 1970. Her performance earned Academy Award¬†and¬†Golden Globe¬†nominations, winning the Kansas City Film Critics Circle (KCFCC) Award for Best Supporting Actress, the¬†Golden Laurel¬†for Best Comedy Performance (Female) and a second-place¬†National Society of Film Critics (NSFC) Award for Best Supporting Actress. Kellerman was featured in¬†Life¬†magazine. She again collaborated with Altman in Brewster McCloud¬†as Louise, guardian angel to¬†Bud Cort, and recorded “Rock-a-Bye Baby” for the film’s soundtrack. The actress’s next role was a hostile, chain-smoking, sex-addicted woman who was trying to have an afternoon affair with¬†Alan Arkin’s character in¬†Gene Saks’s film adaptation of¬†Neil Simon’s comedy¬†Last of the Red Hot Lovers.

Her next roles included a woman involved in a deadly plot in the¬†slasher film¬†A Reflection of Fear; an eccentric woman in the¬†road movie¬†Slither¬†opposite¬†James Caan, and a tormented journalist in¬†Charles Jarrott’s musical¬†remake¬†of¬†Frank Capra’s¬†Lost Horizon¬†(also contributing to the latter’s soundtrack). Two years later, she played Mackinley Beachwood in¬†Dick Richards’¬†Rafferty and the Gold Dust Twins, also singing “Honky Tonk Angels”. In the 80s she n¬†Adrian Lyne’s¬†Foxes¬†(1980); Martha, a six-times-married eccentric, in¬†Bill Persky’s¬†Serial, and the silly-but-sophisticated Mrs. Liggett in¬†Jack Smight’s¬†Loving Couples. The actress hosted¬†Saturday Night Live in 1981, and a few made for tv movies, Secret Weapons¬†(1985); the sadomasochistic Judge Nedra Henderson in¬†Moving Violations¬†(1985);¬†Rodney Dangerfield’s love interest in¬†Alan Metter’s comedy¬†Back to School (1986).

She then played Julie Andrews’ and Jack Lemmon’s eccentric neighbor in Blake Edwards’ That’s Life (1986); a porn star trying to get into heaven in Meatballs III: Summer Job (1986); Kerri Green’s mother in Three for the Road (1987), and an actress in Henry Jaglom’s Someone to Love. She would work into her 80s, with several acclaimed television performances in her final years. She starred in the comedy series ‚ÄúDecker‚ÄĚ with Tim Heidecker and played comedian Mark Maron’s mother on his series ‚ÄúMaron.‚ÄĚ And in 2014 she was nominated for an Emmy for her recurring role on ‚ÄúThe Young and the Restless.‚ÄĚ Kellerman was married to television producer Rick Edelstein from 1970 to 1972 and to movie producer Jonathan D. Krane from 1980 until his death in 2016. She is survived by her son Jack and daughter Claire.

The Captain James T Kirk In The Captain’s Chair Funko Pop

This Star Trek: The Original Series Captain Kirk in Chair Funko Pop! Vinyl Figure measures approximately 3 3/4-inches tall. Comes package in a window display box. Your collection of¬†Star Trek: Original Series isn’t complete without Pop! Captain Kirk seated in the captain’s chair. Enlist Pop! Captain Kirk and the rest of the crew to serve in your Star Trek collection. I have ordered mine on 4th Jan and just received it today. I will do the unboxing later.

The Star Trek collection can’t explore the final frontier and discover new civilizations without its captain and crew! Funko is here to help you recruit your Starfleet personnel as Pop! vinyl figures for your Star Trek: The Original Series collection. There’s Pop! Captain Kirk in Chair, Pop! Khan, Pop! Kirk (Mirror Mirror Outfit), Pop! Spock (Mirror Mirror Outfit), Pop! Sulu (Mirror Mirror Outfit), and Pop! Uhura (Mirror Mirror Outfit). Capture and commemorate some of the most iconic moments of the original series for your set today! The Funko exclusive in this collection is Pop! Spock with cat. Pop! Gorn with weapon is a Target exclusive.

RIP Joanne Linville

Joanne Linville, who made a memorable Star Trek appearance as a¬†Romulan¬†commander in the original TV series,¬†died Sunday in Los Angeles.¬†She was 93. In a statement to USA TODAY, her family said Linville “lived a full life.” “One whose spirit, passion for art and life was an inspiration to all who had the pleasure of knowing her,” the statement continued. “A loving mother and proud grandmother.”

The actress,¬†born Beverly Joanne Linville on Jan. 15, 1928, in Bakersfield, California,¬†stood out in an acclaimed 1961 episode of¬†“The Twilight Zone.” She played a Southern belle in¬†the final days of the Civil War who learns the cost¬†of war and hatred in one of the classic series’ famous twists. Linville’s motion-picture credits include¬†The Goddess¬†(1958),¬†Scorpio¬†(1973),¬†Gable and Lombard¬†(1976),¬†A Star Is Born¬†(1976),¬†The Seduction¬†(1982), and¬†James Dean (2001). In 1968, she guest-starred as a¬†Romulan¬†commander in¬†Star Trek episode “The Enterprise Incident”. Her other television appearances include¬†Decoy,¬†Alfred Hitchcock Presents,¬†Have Gun Will Travel,¬†Coronado 9,¬†Checkmate,¬† Gunsmoke (three episodes), Bonanza¬†(“The Bridegroom”),¬†The Fugitive, Hawaii Five-O (three episodes,¬†Charlie’s Angels,¬†CHIPS,¬†Mrs. Columbo,¬†Dynasty,¬†and¬†L.A. Law.

 She and actress Irene Gilbert co-founded the Stella Adler Academy in Los Angeles in 1985.Linville was married to actor/director Mark Rydell from 1962 until their divorce in 1973. Linville played gossip columnist Hedda Hopper in the television movie James Dean (2001), and Rydell directed the film and also played Jack L. Warner. Linville had two children with Rydell: Amy and Christopher, both actors.

Star Trek Jokes : Lightbulbs

Q: How many Ferengi does it take to change a light bulb? Two: one for changing it and another one to sell the broken one

Q: How many Klingons does it take to change a lightbulb?
A: TWO: One to screw it in, and one to stab the other in the back and
take all of the credit.

Q: How many Klingons does it take to change a lightbulb?
A: NONE: Klingons aren’t afraid of the dark.

Q: What do the Klingons do with the dead bulb?
A: Execute it for failure.

Q: What do the Klingons do with the Klingon who replaces the bulb?
A: Execute him for cowardice.

Q: How many Romulans does it take to screw in a light bulb?
A: ONE HUNDRED FIFTY_ONE: One to screw the light bulb in, and 150 to self-destruct the ship out of disgrace.

Q: How many Vulcans does it take to screw in a light bulb?
A: Approximately 1.00000000000000000000000000000000

Q: How many Borg does it take to change a light-bulb?
A: All of them!

RIP Grant Imahara

Actor Grant Masaru Imahara (October 23, 1970 ‚Äď July 13, 2020) was an American electrical engineer, roboticist, and television host. He was best known for his work on the television series MythBusters, on which he designed and built numerous robots and specialized in operating computers and electronics to test myths. Prior to his television career, Imahara worked at Lucasfilm in the THX division as an engineer and in the Industrial Light and Magic division in visual effects.

Imahara also appeared on the television show BattleBots, for which he designed and competed with his robot Deadblow and later returned as a judge. Imahara starred in the 2016 Netflix series White Rabbit Project alongside his MythBusters co-stars Kari Byron and Tory Belleci.

One of Imahara’s independent projects, during early 2010, was constructing a robotic¬†sidekick¬†for¬†Craig Ferguson, host of¬†The Late Late Show. The robot, named¬†Geoff Peterson, was unveiled on the April 5, 2010¬†Late Late Show¬†episode and is controlled and voiced by comedian and voice actor¬†Josh Robert Thompson.

Imahara portrayed¬†Hikaru Sulu¬†in all 11 episodes of the web series¬†Star Trek Continues. This the only project of his that I have seen and I think that he did a fine job. He also played Lt. Masaru in the 2015 fan movie¬†Star Trek Renegades. In 2014, Imahara appeared in a series of videos showing the behind the scenes process of how several¬†McDonald’s¬†foods are made. In 2015, he appeared in the TV movie¬†Sharknado 3: Oh Hell No! In December 2016, Imahara became engaged to his long-time girlfriend, costume designer Jennifer Newman. Imahara died on July 13, 2020, at the age of 49 as a result of a¬†brain aneurysm.